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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Management of Cold Water-induced Hypothermia: A Simulation Scenario for Layperson Training Delivered via a Mobile Tele-simulation Unit



Abstract

Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) has one of the highest provincial drowning rates in Canada, largely due to the many rural communities located near bodies of water. Factor in the province’s cold climate (average NL’s freshwater temperature is below 5.4°C) and the prevalence of winter recreational activities among the population, there exists an inherent risk of ice-related injuries and subsequent hypothermia. Oftentimes, these injuries occur in remote/rural settings where immediate support from Emergency Medical Services (EMS) may not be available. During this critical period, it frequently falls on individuals without formal healthcare training to provide lifesaving measures until help arrives.

Training individuals in rural communities plays an important role in ensuring public safety. In recent years, simulation-based education has become an essential tool in medical, marine and first aid training. It provides learners with a safe environment to hone their skills and has been shown to be superior to traditional clinical teaching methods. The following case aims to train laypeople from rural settings in the immediate management of an individual who becomes hypothermic following immersion into cold water.

However, reaching these individuals to provide training can be a challenge in a province with such a vast geography. To assist with overcoming this, the development of a simulation center that is portable between communities (or Mobile Tele-Simulation Unit) has occurred. By utilizing modern technology, this paper also proposes an innovative method of connecting with learners in more difficult to reach regions.



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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Management of Cold Water-induced Hypothermia: A Simulation Scenario for Layperson Training Delivered via a Mobile Tele-simulation Unit


Author Information

Cody L. Dunne Corresponding Author

Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Michael Parsons

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Dr. Adam Dubrowski and the Tuckamore Simulation Research Collaborative (TSRC) for research support and advice. The MTU project is supported by an Ignite Grant from the Research and Development Corporation (RDC) of NL.


Technical report
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Management of Cold Water-induced Hypothermia: A Simulation Scenario for Layperson Training Delivered via a Mobile Tele-simulation Unit


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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Management of Cold Water-induced Hypothermia: A Simulation Scenario for Layperson Training Delivered via a Mobile Tele-simulation Unit

  • Author Information
    Cody L. Dunne Corresponding Author

    Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

    Michael Parsons

    Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements

    Thanks to Dr. Adam Dubrowski and the Tuckamore Simulation Research Collaborative (TSRC) for research support and advice. The MTU project is supported by an Ignite Grant from the Research and Development Corporation (RDC) of NL.


    Article Information

    Published: December 26, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1990

    Cite this article as:

    Dunne C L, Parsons M (December 26, 2017) Management of Cold Water-induced Hypothermia: A Simulation Scenario for Layperson Training Delivered via a Mobile Tele-simulation Unit. Cureus 9(12): e1990. doi:10.7759/cureus.1990

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: November 15, 2017
    Peer review began: December 07, 2017
    Peer review concluded: December 13, 2017
    Published: December 26, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Dunne et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) has one of the highest provincial drowning rates in Canada, largely due to the many rural communities located near bodies of water. Factor in the province’s cold climate (average NL’s freshwater temperature is below 5.4°C) and the prevalence of winter recreational activities among the population, there exists an inherent risk of ice-related injuries and subsequent hypothermia. Oftentimes, these injuries occur in remote/rural settings where immediate support from Emergency Medical Services (EMS) may not be available. During this critical period, it frequently falls on individuals without formal healthcare training to provide lifesaving measures until help arrives.

Training individuals in rural communities plays an important role in ensuring public safety. In recent years, simulation-based education has become an essential tool in medical, marine and first aid training. It provides learners with a safe environment to hone their skills and has been shown to be superior to traditional clinical teaching methods. The following case aims to train laypeople from rural settings in the immediate management of an individual who becomes hypothermic following immersion into cold water.

However, reaching these individuals to provide training can be a challenge in a province with such a vast geography. To assist with overcoming this, the development of a simulation center that is portable between communities (or Mobile Tele-Simulation Unit) has occurred. By utilizing modern technology, this paper also proposes an innovative method of connecting with learners in more difficult to reach regions.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Cody L. Dunne, Medical Student

Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

For correspondence:
cody.dunne@mun.ca

Michael Parsons, M.D., Assistant Professor

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Cody L. Dunne, Medical Student

Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

For correspondence:
cody.dunne@mun.ca

Michael Parsons, M.D., Assistant Professor

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland