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Original article
peer-reviewed

Physician’s Perception Versus Patient’s Actual Incidence of Drug Non-adherence in Chronic Illnesses



Abstract

Objectives

Treatment adherence is crucial to the success of a management plan. The objectives of this study are (i) to assess medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases, (ii) to assess if physicians correctly perceive medication adherence among said patients, and (iii) to investigate the factors associated with low drug adherence.

Materials & methods

This observational cross-sectional study included 283 patients and 208 physicians from various hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. The participants in the “patient group” completed the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale form. The participants in the “physician group” completed a questionnaire with questions related to their perception of their patients’ characteristics of adherence to medical prescriptions. Data were entered and analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows, Version 22.0. (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY).

Results

The actual incidence of low drug adherence among patients with chronic diseases is 85%. However, the perceived incidence by physicians is 40%. Low adherence was common in women, individuals aged 35 to 50 years, and individuals who were single and illiterate. Adherence decreased with an increasing number of pills, duration of treatment, and increasing average expense of medications. The actual most common barrier to adherence among patients is medication cost; however, physicians perceive forgetfulness to be the more common barrier.

Conclusion

Patients with chronic illnesses have low medication adherence levels. Physicians, however, misinterpret the frequency of low adherence. Our findings will help physicians have a more real and accurate understanding of the challenges their patients face in long-term adherence to treatment regimens. It may ultimately lead to improved treatment adherence and quality of management once patients’ actual challenges are addressed and necessary steps are taken.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Physician’s Perception Versus Patient’s Actual Incidence of Drug Non-adherence in Chronic Illnesses


Author Information

Amber Siddiqui Corresponding Author

Dow University of Health Sciences, Jinnah Sindh Medical University (SMC)

Anum S. Siddiqui

Clinical Research Associate, Clinision, Pharmevo Pvt. Limited

Masood Jawaid

Medical Affairs, Pharmevo

General Surgery, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, Pakistan

Kamran Ali Zaman

Clinical Research Assistant, Pharmevo Pvt. Limited


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: Anum S. Siddiqui;
Masood Jawaid;
Kamran Zaman declare(s) a grant and employment from PharmEvo (Pvt) Ltd. These authors are employees of PharmEvo (Pvt) Ltd. However, they have not received any separate honorarium for this research work, nor is this study reporting results of any product. PharmEvo (Pvt) Ltd with its "Clinision" Division provided financial support for administrative work (printing, data collection, statistical analysis, and editing service payment) of the study. . Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Acknowledgements

This study is funded by Academic and Research Grant of PharmEvo (Pvt), Ltd.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Physician’s Perception Versus Patient’s Actual Incidence of Drug Non-adherence in Chronic Illnesses


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Physician’s Perception Versus Patient’s Actual Incidence of Drug Non-adherence in Chronic Illnesses

Amber Siddiqui">Amber Siddiqui , Anum S. Siddiqui">Anum S. Siddiqui, Masood Jawaid">Masood Jawaid, Kamran Ali Zaman">Kamran Ali Zaman

  • Author Information
    Amber Siddiqui Corresponding Author

    Dow University of Health Sciences, Jinnah Sindh Medical University (SMC)

    Anum S. Siddiqui

    Clinical Research Associate, Clinision, Pharmevo Pvt. Limited

    Masood Jawaid

    Medical Affairs, Pharmevo

    General Surgery, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, Pakistan

    Kamran Ali Zaman

    Clinical Research Assistant, Pharmevo Pvt. Limited


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: Anum S. Siddiqui;
    Masood Jawaid;
    Kamran Zaman declare(s) a grant and employment from PharmEvo (Pvt) Ltd. These authors are employees of PharmEvo (Pvt) Ltd. However, they have not received any separate honorarium for this research work, nor is this study reporting results of any product. PharmEvo (Pvt) Ltd with its "Clinision" Division provided financial support for administrative work (printing, data collection, statistical analysis, and editing service payment) of the study. . Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements

    This study is funded by Academic and Research Grant of PharmEvo (Pvt), Ltd.


    Article Information

    Published: November 29, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1893

    Cite this article as:

    Siddiqui A, Siddiqui A S, Jawaid M, et al. (November 29, 2017) Physician’s Perception Versus Patient’s Actual Incidence of Drug Non-adherence in Chronic Illnesses. Cureus 9(11): e1893. doi:10.7759/cureus.1893

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: October 23, 2017
    Peer review began: October 24, 2017
    Peer review concluded: November 23, 2017
    Published: November 29, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Siddiqui et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Objectives

Treatment adherence is crucial to the success of a management plan. The objectives of this study are (i) to assess medication adherence in patients with chronic diseases, (ii) to assess if physicians correctly perceive medication adherence among said patients, and (iii) to investigate the factors associated with low drug adherence.

Materials & methods

This observational cross-sectional study included 283 patients and 208 physicians from various hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. The participants in the “patient group” completed the eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale form. The participants in the “physician group” completed a questionnaire with questions related to their perception of their patients’ characteristics of adherence to medical prescriptions. Data were entered and analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows, Version 22.0. (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY).

Results

The actual incidence of low drug adherence among patients with chronic diseases is 85%. However, the perceived incidence by physicians is 40%. Low adherence was common in women, individuals aged 35 to 50 years, and individuals who were single and illiterate. Adherence decreased with an increasing number of pills, duration of treatment, and increasing average expense of medications. The actual most common barrier to adherence among patients is medication cost; however, physicians perceive forgetfulness to be the more common barrier.

Conclusion

Patients with chronic illnesses have low medication adherence levels. Physicians, however, misinterpret the frequency of low adherence. Our findings will help physicians have a more real and accurate understanding of the challenges their patients face in long-term adherence to treatment regimens. It may ultimately lead to improved treatment adherence and quality of management once patients’ actual challenges are addressed and necessary steps are taken.



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Amber Siddiqui, M.D.

Dow University of Health Sciences, Jinnah Sindh Medical University (SMC)

For correspondence:
siddiquiambertahir@gmail.com

Anum S. Siddiqui, PharmD

Clinical Research Associate, Clinision, Pharmevo Pvt. Limited

Masood Jawaid

Medical Affairs, Pharmevo

Kamran Ali Zaman, PharmD

Clinical Research Assistant, Pharmevo Pvt. Limited

Amber Siddiqui, M.D.

Dow University of Health Sciences, Jinnah Sindh Medical University (SMC)

For correspondence:
siddiquiambertahir@gmail.com

Anum S. Siddiqui, PharmD

Clinical Research Associate, Clinision, Pharmevo Pvt. Limited

Masood Jawaid

Medical Affairs, Pharmevo

Kamran Ali Zaman, PharmD

Clinical Research Assistant, Pharmevo Pvt. Limited