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Original article
peer-reviewed

Comparison of Online Dementia Information in Chinese and in English Languages



Abstract

Introduction

There is a deficit of avenues for obtaining dementia information in the Asian American community. This study aims to compare the content and quality differences between websites providing information on dementia as found by a Google search conducted both in simplified Chinese characters and in English.

Methods

A Google search was performed for the phrase “dementia” in simplified Chinese characters and in English. The resultant websites were categorized by whether they were commercial in nature, the type of website, and whether the website provided an explanation of dementia signs and symptoms. The quality of the websites was assessed via readability and the Health on the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode). Chi-squared analyses were performed to establish differences between the English and simplified Chinese results.

Results

The simplified Chinese search websites were more likely to be commercial (p=0.045) and were more likely to not meet HONcode standards (p=0.008). No statistical significance was observed between the types of websites (p=0.127), the prevalence of signs and symptom explanations (p=0.073), and the readability of the website (p=0.151).

Conclusion

The quality of websites obtained from the simplified Chinese character Google search was lower than those obtained from searches using the English language. Given the limited sources of language and culturally appropriate information on dementia, improvement of Internet resources may help to improve health outcomes of dementia patients in the Asian American population.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Comparison of Online Dementia Information in Chinese and in English Languages


Author Information

John T. Tsiang

Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Comparison of Online Dementia Information in Chinese and in English Languages

John T. Tsiang">John T. Tsiang, Benjamin K. Woo">Benjamin K. Woo

  • Author Information
    John T. Tsiang

    Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

    Benjamin K. Woo Corresponding Author

    UCLA


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: October 28, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1808

    Cite this article as:

    Tsiang J T, Woo B K (October 28, 2017) Comparison of Online Dementia Information in Chinese and in English Languages. Cureus 9(10): e1808. doi:10.7759/cureus.1808

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: October 19, 2017
    Peer review began: October 23, 2017
    Peer review concluded: October 26, 2017
    Published: October 28, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Tsiang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Introduction

There is a deficit of avenues for obtaining dementia information in the Asian American community. This study aims to compare the content and quality differences between websites providing information on dementia as found by a Google search conducted both in simplified Chinese characters and in English.

Methods

A Google search was performed for the phrase “dementia” in simplified Chinese characters and in English. The resultant websites were categorized by whether they were commercial in nature, the type of website, and whether the website provided an explanation of dementia signs and symptoms. The quality of the websites was assessed via readability and the Health on the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode). Chi-squared analyses were performed to establish differences between the English and simplified Chinese results.

Results

The simplified Chinese search websites were more likely to be commercial (p=0.045) and were more likely to not meet HONcode standards (p=0.008). No statistical significance was observed between the types of websites (p=0.127), the prevalence of signs and symptom explanations (p=0.073), and the readability of the website (p=0.151).

Conclusion

The quality of websites obtained from the simplified Chinese character Google search was lower than those obtained from searches using the English language. Given the limited sources of language and culturally appropriate information on dementia, improvement of Internet resources may help to improve health outcomes of dementia patients in the Asian American population.



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John T. Tsiang, Medical Student

Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Benjamin K. Woo, M.D.

UCLA

For correspondence:
bewoo@dhs.lacounty.gov

John T. Tsiang, Medical Student

Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Benjamin K. Woo, M.D.

UCLA

For correspondence:
bewoo@dhs.lacounty.gov