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Original article
peer-reviewed

Frequency and Factors Associated with Adult Immunization in Patients Visiting Family Medicine Clinics at a Tertiary Care Hospital, Karachi



Abstract

Objective

The goal of this study was to determine the frequency and factors associated with adult immunization in patients visiting family medicine clinics at a tertiary care hospital in Karachi.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2014 to March 2015 in a tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Participants more than 18 years were invited to participate in the study. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect information. Data were entered and analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, version 19.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp).

Results

A total of 340 patients were surveyed. The majority of patients were female (69.5%) with a mean age of 35.47 years. The majority were married (61.1%), and 30% of the participants had completed graduation or postgraduate education (20%). Most of the patients believed that vaccines can be used in adults to prevent disease (62.2%). Patients believed that the hepatitis B vaccine, influenza vaccine, and hepatitis A vaccine can be administered to adults (58.1%, 29.9%, 33.8%, respectively). The major sources of their information regarding vaccination in adults were friends or relatives (25%) and media (23.2%). Regarding availability of vaccines, 71.3% thought a hepatitis B vaccine is available, 54.9% thought a tuberculosis vaccine is available, and 49.3% thought a tetanus toxoid vaccine is available. Only 36.4% respondents received any vaccine in adulthood. The majority of patients (62.2%) received the hepatitis B vaccine in adulthood. The major reason given for not receiving vaccines was lack of awareness (62.4%).

Conclusion

Low adult vaccination coverage rates and awareness, as highlighted by the results of this study, show the dire need to address this major preventive strategy. This information can be utilized to conduct larger community-based surveys, to conduct health awareness sessions in the community, and to educate our doctors regarding the availability and benefits of adult vaccines.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Frequency and Factors Associated with Adult Immunization in Patients Visiting Family Medicine Clinics at a Tertiary Care Hospital, Karachi


Author Information

Samar Zaki

Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

Asma Usman

Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

Swaleha Tariq

Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

Sameena Shah

Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

Iqbal Azam

Community Health Sciences, The Aga University

Waris Qidwai

Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

Kashmira Nanji Corresponding Author

Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Frequency and Factors Associated with Adult Immunization in Patients Visiting Family Medicine Clinics at a Tertiary Care Hospital, Karachi


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Frequency and Factors Associated with Adult Immunization in Patients Visiting Family Medicine Clinics at a Tertiary Care Hospital, Karachi

  • Author Information
    Samar Zaki

    Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

    Asma Usman

    Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

    Swaleha Tariq

    Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

    Sameena Shah

    Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

    Iqbal Azam

    Community Health Sciences, The Aga University

    Waris Qidwai

    Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University

    Kashmira Nanji Corresponding Author

    Family Medicine, The Aga Khan University


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: January 17, 2018

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.2083

    Cite this article as:

    Zaki S, Usman A, Tariq S, et al. (January 17, 2018) Frequency and Factors Associated with Adult Immunization in Patients Visiting Family Medicine Clinics at a Tertiary Care Hospital, Karachi. Cureus 10(1): e2083. doi:10.7759/cureus.2083

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: October 16, 2017
    Peer review began: January 09, 2018
    Peer review concluded: January 11, 2018
    Published: January 17, 2018

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2018
    Zaki et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Objective

The goal of this study was to determine the frequency and factors associated with adult immunization in patients visiting family medicine clinics at a tertiary care hospital in Karachi.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted from March 2014 to March 2015 in a tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Participants more than 18 years were invited to participate in the study. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect information. Data were entered and analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, version 19.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp).

Results

A total of 340 patients were surveyed. The majority of patients were female (69.5%) with a mean age of 35.47 years. The majority were married (61.1%), and 30% of the participants had completed graduation or postgraduate education (20%). Most of the patients believed that vaccines can be used in adults to prevent disease (62.2%). Patients believed that the hepatitis B vaccine, influenza vaccine, and hepatitis A vaccine can be administered to adults (58.1%, 29.9%, 33.8%, respectively). The major sources of their information regarding vaccination in adults were friends or relatives (25%) and media (23.2%). Regarding availability of vaccines, 71.3% thought a hepatitis B vaccine is available, 54.9% thought a tuberculosis vaccine is available, and 49.3% thought a tetanus toxoid vaccine is available. Only 36.4% respondents received any vaccine in adulthood. The majority of patients (62.2%) received the hepatitis B vaccine in adulthood. The major reason given for not receiving vaccines was lack of awareness (62.4%).

Conclusion

Low adult vaccination coverage rates and awareness, as highlighted by the results of this study, show the dire need to address this major preventive strategy. This information can be utilized to conduct larger community-based surveys, to conduct health awareness sessions in the community, and to educate our doctors regarding the availability and benefits of adult vaccines.



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