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Case report
peer-reviewed

Cervical Funneling: Potential Pitfall of Point-of-Care Pelvic Ultrasound



Abstract

Though point-of-care ultrasound applications continue to expand, there are findings that are not within the scope of emergency ultrasound. It is important for emergency physicians to be aware of incidental findings that can be identified on comprehensive ultrasounds performed by other imaging departments in order to fully understand the limitations of bedside ultrasound. In this case, a gravid patient presented to the emergency department with pelvic cramping and vaginal bleeding. Point-of-care transabdominal pelvic ultrasound examination was performed and demonstrated cervical funneling. In the appropriate patient, cervical insufficiency due to cervical funneling may be an indication for cerclage in a pregnant patient.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Cervical Funneling: Potential Pitfall of Point-of-Care Pelvic Ultrasound


Author Information

Lori A. Stolz

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati

Richard Amini Corresponding Author

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

Elaine H. Situ-LaCasse

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

Faryal Shareef

College of Medicine, University of Arizona

Heather A. Reed

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arizona

Srikar Adhikari

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Informed consent obtained. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Cervical Funneling: Potential Pitfall of Point-of-Care Pelvic Ultrasound


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Cervical Funneling: Potential Pitfall of Point-of-Care Pelvic Ultrasound

Lori A. Stolz">Lori A. Stolz, Richard Amini">Richard Amini , Elaine H. Situ-LaCasse ">Elaine H. Situ-LaCasse , Faryal Shareef">Faryal Shareef, Heather A. Reed">Heather A. Reed, Srikar Adhikari">Srikar Adhikari

  • Author Information
    Lori A. Stolz

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati

    Richard Amini Corresponding Author

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

    Elaine H. Situ-LaCasse

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

    Faryal Shareef

    College of Medicine, University of Arizona

    Heather A. Reed

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arizona

    Srikar Adhikari

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Informed consent obtained. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 03, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1649

    Cite this article as:

    Stolz L A, Amini R, Situ-lacasse E H, et al. (September 03, 2017) Cervical Funneling: Potential Pitfall of Point-of-Care Pelvic Ultrasound. Cureus 9(9): e1649. doi:10.7759/cureus.1649

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: August 19, 2017
    Peer review began: August 24, 2017
    Peer review concluded: August 29, 2017
    Published: September 03, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Stolz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Though point-of-care ultrasound applications continue to expand, there are findings that are not within the scope of emergency ultrasound. It is important for emergency physicians to be aware of incidental findings that can be identified on comprehensive ultrasounds performed by other imaging departments in order to fully understand the limitations of bedside ultrasound. In this case, a gravid patient presented to the emergency department with pelvic cramping and vaginal bleeding. Point-of-care transabdominal pelvic ultrasound examination was performed and demonstrated cervical funneling. In the appropriate patient, cervical insufficiency due to cervical funneling may be an indication for cerclage in a pregnant patient.



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Lori A. Stolz

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati

Richard Amini, M.D., Associate Professor

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

For correspondence:
richardamini@gmail.com

Elaine H. Situ-LaCasse

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

Faryal Shareef

College of Medicine, University of Arizona

Heather A. Reed

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arizona

Srikar Adhikari

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

Lori A. Stolz

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati

Richard Amini, M.D., Associate Professor

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

For correspondence:
richardamini@gmail.com

Elaine H. Situ-LaCasse

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona

Faryal Shareef

College of Medicine, University of Arizona

Heather A. Reed

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Arizona

Srikar Adhikari

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona