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Case report
peer-reviewed

Subtotal Resection of a Thalamic Glioblastoma Multiforme through Transsylvian Approach



Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor with an ominous prognosis. The standard treatment includes maximal safe resection plus adjuvant therapy. Thalamic GBMs, however, are unfavorable for microsurgical removal because of deep location and proximity to critical structures. We present a patient presenting with progressive hemiparesis and decreased consciousness with a large thalamic GBM who underwent subtotal resection through a transsylvian approach. His clinical and neurologic condition improved after surgery and he survived nine months after surgery. This may propose that in selected cases, more aggressive microsurgery for debulking of tumors might have some impact in the final outcome.​​​



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Subtotal Resection of a Thalamic Glioblastoma Multiforme through Transsylvian Approach


Author Information

Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi Corresponding Author

Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School

Homa Sadeghian

Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Alireza M. Mohammadi

Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Bam University of Medical Sciences Ethics Committee issued approval. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Subtotal Resection of a Thalamic Glioblastoma Multiforme through Transsylvian Approach


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Subtotal Resection of a Thalamic Glioblastoma Multiforme through Transsylvian Approach

Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi">Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi , Homa Sadeghian">Homa Sadeghian, Alireza M. Mohammadi">Alireza M. Mohammadi

  • Author Information
    Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi Corresponding Author

    Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School

    Homa Sadeghian

    Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

    Alireza M. Mohammadi

    Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Bam University of Medical Sciences Ethics Committee issued approval. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 07, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1662

    Cite this article as:

    Motiei-langroudi R, Sadeghian H, M. mohammadi A (September 07, 2017) Subtotal Resection of a Thalamic Glioblastoma Multiforme through Transsylvian Approach. Cureus 9(9): e1662. doi:10.7759/cureus.1662

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: August 09, 2017
    Peer review began: August 27, 2017
    Peer review concluded: August 29, 2017
    Published: September 07, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Motiei-Langroudi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a malignant brain tumor with an ominous prognosis. The standard treatment includes maximal safe resection plus adjuvant therapy. Thalamic GBMs, however, are unfavorable for microsurgical removal because of deep location and proximity to critical structures. We present a patient presenting with progressive hemiparesis and decreased consciousness with a large thalamic GBM who underwent subtotal resection through a transsylvian approach. His clinical and neurologic condition improved after surgery and he survived nine months after surgery. This may propose that in selected cases, more aggressive microsurgery for debulking of tumors might have some impact in the final outcome.​​​



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Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi, M.D., Fellow Physician

Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School

For correspondence:
r_motiei@yahoo.com

Homa Sadeghian

Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Alireza M. Mohammadi, M.D.

Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic

Rouzbeh Motiei-Langroudi, M.D., Fellow Physician

Neurosurgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School

For correspondence:
r_motiei@yahoo.com

Homa Sadeghian

Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School

Alireza M. Mohammadi, M.D.

Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic