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Original article
peer-reviewed

Anterolateral Triangle: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance



Abstract

The anterolateral triangle is one of 10 surgical triangles of the cavernous sinus and serves as an important anatomic landmark for the skull base surgeon. There are few studies in the English literature that have precisely defined and measured the borders of the anterolateral triangle and little agreement has been made regarding the nomenclature within the English literature. A total of 12 midsagittally hemisected adult human cadaveric head halves were dissected to expose the anterolateral triangle. The triangle was defined and measurements of the anterior, posterior, and lateral borders were taken. The mean lengths and standard deviations of the anterior, posterior, and lateral borders were 8.3 ± 2.2 mm, 5.9 ± 2.0 mm, and 11.5 ± 2.9 mm, respectively. The mean area and standard deviation were 20.46 ± 9.30 mm2. The anterolateral triangle is helpful in understanding and planning surgical approaches to the cavernous sinus and middle cranial fossa. As such, normal anatomic relationships and the sizes of the anterolateral triangle must first be recognized to better access the pathologic changes within and around this region.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Anterolateral Triangle: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance


Author Information

Andre Granger Corresponding Author

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

Neurology, NYU Langone Hospital - Brooklyn

Ornella Bricoune

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St George's University

Tina Rajnauth

Icu/Anaesthetics, Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex

David Kimball

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St George's University

Heather Kimball

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St George's University

R. Shane Tubbs

Neurosurgery, Seattle Science Foundation

Marios Loukas

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank medical illustrator, Xochitl Vinaja, MS, at St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies for the creation of the illustration used in this publication.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Anterolateral Triangle: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Anterolateral Triangle: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance

  • Author Information
    Andre Granger Corresponding Author

    Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

    Neurology, NYU Langone Hospital - Brooklyn

    Ornella Bricoune

    Department of Anatomical Sciences, St George's University

    Tina Rajnauth

    Icu/Anaesthetics, Eric Williams Medical Sciences Complex

    David Kimball

    Department of Anatomical Sciences, St George's University

    Heather Kimball

    Department of Anatomical Sciences, St George's University

    R. Shane Tubbs

    Neurosurgery, Seattle Science Foundation

    Marios Loukas

    Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements

    The authors wish to thank medical illustrator, Xochitl Vinaja, MS, at St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies for the creation of the illustration used in this publication.


    Article Information

    Published: February 12, 2018

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.2185

    Cite this article as:

    Granger A, Bricoune O, Rajnauth T, et al. (February 12, 2018) Anterolateral Triangle: A Cadaveric Study with Neurosurgical Significance. Cureus 10(2): e2185. doi:10.7759/cureus.2185

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: August 07, 2017
    Peer review began: January 17, 2018
    Peer review concluded: February 11, 2018
    Published: February 12, 2018

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2018
    Granger et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

The anterolateral triangle is one of 10 surgical triangles of the cavernous sinus and serves as an important anatomic landmark for the skull base surgeon. There are few studies in the English literature that have precisely defined and measured the borders of the anterolateral triangle and little agreement has been made regarding the nomenclature within the English literature. A total of 12 midsagittally hemisected adult human cadaveric head halves were dissected to expose the anterolateral triangle. The triangle was defined and measurements of the anterior, posterior, and lateral borders were taken. The mean lengths and standard deviations of the anterior, posterior, and lateral borders were 8.3 ± 2.2 mm, 5.9 ± 2.0 mm, and 11.5 ± 2.9 mm, respectively. The mean area and standard deviation were 20.46 ± 9.30 mm2. The anterolateral triangle is helpful in understanding and planning surgical approaches to the cavernous sinus and middle cranial fossa. As such, normal anatomic relationships and the sizes of the anterolateral triangle must first be recognized to better access the pathologic changes within and around this region.



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