"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

Margaret Mead
Case report
peer-reviewed

Arachnoid Cyst and Psychosis



Abstract

Few case reports discuss suspected psychiatric disturbances secondary to arachnoid cysts. To the best of our knowledge, psychosis from arachnoid cysts has not been reported in the recent literature. This case report discusses our experience with a 55-year-old male patient who manifested multiple psychotic episodes suspected in association with an arachnoid cyst. During the initial examinations, a computed tomography (CT) scan of his head revealed a relatively large left anterior superior arachnoid cyst with a mass effect on the frontal lobe. Despite multiple trials of combinations of mood stabilizers and psychotropic medications, the patient continued to deteriorate. We ordered a repeat CT of his head along with a magnetic resonance image and consulted a neurosurgeon for a possible surgical intervention. The neurosurgeon concluded that the patient’s psychiatric symptoms were unrelated to the arachnoid cyst. While we were unable to determine the etiology of our patient’s psychosis, we believe that the arachnoid cyst played at least some part, as evidenced by reports in the literature. Future advancements in radiological technology may allow for a better exploration of the causal relationship between psychiatric illnesses and brain lesions. 



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

Already a member? Login.



Case report
peer-reviewed

Arachnoid Cyst and Psychosis


Author Information

Afaque H. Khan Corresponding Author

Psychiatry, Heartland Behavioral Healthcare, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, State of Ohio, Northeast Ohio Medical University

Syed E. Ahmed

Heartland Behavioral Healthcare, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, State of Ohio, Northeast Ohio Medical University


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Arachnoid Cyst and Psychosis


Figures etc.

Share
Case report
peer-reviewed

Arachnoid Cyst and Psychosis

Afaque H. Khan">Afaque H. Khan , Syed E. Ahmed">Syed E. Ahmed

  • Author Information
    Afaque H. Khan Corresponding Author

    Psychiatry, Heartland Behavioral Healthcare, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, State of Ohio, Northeast Ohio Medical University

    Syed E. Ahmed

    Heartland Behavioral Healthcare, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, State of Ohio, Northeast Ohio Medical University


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 21, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1707

    Cite this article as:

    Khan A H, Ahmed S E (September 21, 2017) Arachnoid Cyst and Psychosis. Cureus 9(9): e1707. doi:10.7759/cureus.1707

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: August 08, 2017
    Peer review began: September 11, 2017
    Peer review concluded: September 15, 2017
    Published: September 21, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Khan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Few case reports discuss suspected psychiatric disturbances secondary to arachnoid cysts. To the best of our knowledge, psychosis from arachnoid cysts has not been reported in the recent literature. This case report discusses our experience with a 55-year-old male patient who manifested multiple psychotic episodes suspected in association with an arachnoid cyst. During the initial examinations, a computed tomography (CT) scan of his head revealed a relatively large left anterior superior arachnoid cyst with a mass effect on the frontal lobe. Despite multiple trials of combinations of mood stabilizers and psychotropic medications, the patient continued to deteriorate. We ordered a repeat CT of his head along with a magnetic resonance image and consulted a neurosurgeon for a possible surgical intervention. The neurosurgeon concluded that the patient’s psychiatric symptoms were unrelated to the arachnoid cyst. While we were unable to determine the etiology of our patient’s psychosis, we believe that the arachnoid cyst played at least some part, as evidenced by reports in the literature. Future advancements in radiological technology may allow for a better exploration of the causal relationship between psychiatric illnesses and brain lesions. 



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

Already a member? Login.



Afaque H. Khan, M.D.

Psychiatry, Heartland Behavioral Healthcare, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, State of Ohio, Northeast Ohio Medical University

For correspondence:
hassan.khan@mha.ohio.gov

Syed E. Ahmed

Heartland Behavioral Healthcare, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, State of Ohio, Northeast Ohio Medical University

Afaque H. Khan, M.D.

Psychiatry, Heartland Behavioral Healthcare, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, State of Ohio, Northeast Ohio Medical University

For correspondence:
hassan.khan@mha.ohio.gov

Syed E. Ahmed

Heartland Behavioral Healthcare, Department of Mental Health and Addiction, State of Ohio, Northeast Ohio Medical University