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Review article
peer-reviewed

The Effectiveness of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders



Abstract

This review article is an overview of the effectiveness of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. ICBT’s effectiveness has been investigated in treating and managing conditions like depression, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), adjustment disorder, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and phobias. ICBT’s role in the treatment of medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus with comorbid psychiatric illnesses was also explored. Furthermore, this study elaborates on its cost-effectiveness and its impact in rural areas. We conducted a thorough literature search using PubMed and Google Scholar with no restrictions on the date. ICBT's role in treating and controlling psychiatric illnesses has been established in the literature. From the data compiled, we conclude that ICBT is useful in treating mental health and medical illnesses with psychiatric comorbidities. It has also been found to be cost-effective for patients and society. ICBT is a potential tool emerging with modern day technological advancements and is useful in rural and urban settings, across various languages and cultures, and on a global scale. Larger randomized control trials on its use in clinical practice and in reaching rural populations are bound to shed more light on the effectiveness of this tool along with spreading awareness among physician and patient communities.



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Review article
peer-reviewed

The Effectiveness of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders


Author Information

Vikram Kumar Corresponding Author

California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Sri ramachandra University

Yasar Sattar

Research Assistant Psychiatry, SUNY Downstate University

Research Assistant Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital

Icahn Mood and Anxiety Program (map), The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Anan Bseiso

College of Medicine, Al-Quds University

Department of Neuroscience, California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences & Psychology

Sara Khan

California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Dow Medical College, Pakistan

Ian H. Rutkofsky

Research, California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences & Psychology

Medicine, International American University College of Medicine

Group Therapist, Psychiatric Institute of Washington


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

Acknowledgements

The authors of this article would like to thank Hassan Tohid, MBBS, California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Davis, California.


Review article
peer-reviewed

The Effectiveness of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders


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Review article
peer-reviewed

The Effectiveness of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders

Vikram Kumar">Vikram Kumar , Yasar Sattar">Yasar Sattar, Anan Bseiso ">Anan Bseiso , Sara Khan">Sara Khan, Ian H. Rutkofsky">Ian H. Rutkofsky

  • Author Information
    Vikram Kumar Corresponding Author

    California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Sri ramachandra University

    Yasar Sattar

    Research Assistant Psychiatry, SUNY Downstate University

    Research Assistant Emergency Medicine, Kings County Hospital

    Icahn Mood and Anxiety Program (map), The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

    Anan Bseiso

    College of Medicine, Al-Quds University

    Department of Neuroscience, California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences & Psychology

    Sara Khan

    California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Dow Medical College, Pakistan

    Ian H. Rutkofsky

    Research, California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences & Psychology

    Medicine, International American University College of Medicine

    Group Therapist, Psychiatric Institute of Washington


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements

    The authors of this article would like to thank Hassan Tohid, MBBS, California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Davis, California.


    Article Information

    Published: August 29, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1626

    Cite this article as:

    Kumar V, Sattar Y, Bseiso A, et al. (August 29, 2017) The Effectiveness of Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders. Cureus 9(8): e1626. doi:10.7759/cureus.1626

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: July 12, 2017
    Peer review began: July 28, 2017
    Peer review concluded: August 20, 2017
    Published: August 29, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Kumar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

This review article is an overview of the effectiveness of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. ICBT’s effectiveness has been investigated in treating and managing conditions like depression, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), adjustment disorder, bipolar disorder, chronic pain, and phobias. ICBT’s role in the treatment of medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus with comorbid psychiatric illnesses was also explored. Furthermore, this study elaborates on its cost-effectiveness and its impact in rural areas. We conducted a thorough literature search using PubMed and Google Scholar with no restrictions on the date. ICBT's role in treating and controlling psychiatric illnesses has been established in the literature. From the data compiled, we conclude that ICBT is useful in treating mental health and medical illnesses with psychiatric comorbidities. It has also been found to be cost-effective for patients and society. ICBT is a potential tool emerging with modern day technological advancements and is useful in rural and urban settings, across various languages and cultures, and on a global scale. Larger randomized control trials on its use in clinical practice and in reaching rural populations are bound to shed more light on the effectiveness of this tool along with spreading awareness among physician and patient communities.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Vikram Kumar, M.D.

California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Sri ramachandra University

For correspondence:
vikramkumar5791@gmail.com

Yasar Sattar, M.D.

Research Assistant Psychiatry, SUNY Downstate University

Anan Bseiso , M.D.

College of Medicine, Al-Quds University

Sara Khan

California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Dow Medical College, Pakistan

Ian H. Rutkofsky, M.D.

Research, California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences & Psychology

Vikram Kumar, M.D.

California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Sri ramachandra University

For correspondence:
vikramkumar5791@gmail.com

Yasar Sattar, M.D.

Research Assistant Psychiatry, SUNY Downstate University

Anan Bseiso , M.D.

College of Medicine, Al-Quds University

Sara Khan

California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences and Psychology, Dow Medical College, Pakistan

Ian H. Rutkofsky, M.D.

Research, California Institute of Behavioral Neurosciences & Psychology