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Case report
peer-reviewed

Acquired Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A Case Study



Abstract

We present a case of severe acquired acrodermatitis enteropathica in a vegan adult female with multiple underlying comorbidities. Acquired acrodermatitis enteropathica or zinc-deficiency dermatitis is the most common diagnosis than many practitioners realize with up to 10% of the patients in developed nations with the risk of zinc deficiency. The condition can be difficult to diagnose due to many similarly-presenting conditions. Furthermore, comorbid conditions in the patients can serve as confounders to the diagnosis. The symptoms are often extremely distressing for the patients, though the treatment is simple and clinical improvement occurs rapidly with appropriate care. We recommend a high index of suspicion to practitioners as well as a low-threshold for initiating treatment in the patients with any clinical symptoms of the condition.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Acquired Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A Case Study


Author Information

Steven Kelly Corresponding Author

Medical Student, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

John W. Stelzer

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Nathan Esplin

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Ahsan Farooq

Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Olga Karasik

Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Informed consent obtained. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Acquired Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A Case Study


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Acquired Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A Case Study

Steven Kelly">Steven Kelly , John W. Stelzer">John W. Stelzer, Nathan Esplin">Nathan Esplin, Ahsan Farooq">Ahsan Farooq, Olga Karasik">Olga Karasik

  • Author Information
    Steven Kelly Corresponding Author

    Medical Student, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

    John W. Stelzer

    College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

    Nathan Esplin

    College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

    Ahsan Farooq

    Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

    Olga Karasik

    Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Informed consent obtained. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 08, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1667

    Cite this article as:

    Kelly S, Stelzer J W, Esplin N, et al. (September 08, 2017) Acquired Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A Case Study. Cureus 9(9): e1667. doi:10.7759/cureus.1667

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: July 04, 2017
    Peer review began: August 16, 2017
    Peer review concluded: September 04, 2017
    Published: September 08, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Kelly et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

We present a case of severe acquired acrodermatitis enteropathica in a vegan adult female with multiple underlying comorbidities. Acquired acrodermatitis enteropathica or zinc-deficiency dermatitis is the most common diagnosis than many practitioners realize with up to 10% of the patients in developed nations with the risk of zinc deficiency. The condition can be difficult to diagnose due to many similarly-presenting conditions. Furthermore, comorbid conditions in the patients can serve as confounders to the diagnosis. The symptoms are often extremely distressing for the patients, though the treatment is simple and clinical improvement occurs rapidly with appropriate care. We recommend a high index of suspicion to practitioners as well as a low-threshold for initiating treatment in the patients with any clinical symptoms of the condition.



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Steven Kelly

Medical Student, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

For correspondence:
steven.kelly04@knights.ucf.edu

John W. Stelzer, Medical Student

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Nathan Esplin, Medical Student

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Ahsan Farooq

Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Olga Karasik

Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Steven Kelly

Medical Student, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

For correspondence:
steven.kelly04@knights.ucf.edu

John W. Stelzer, Medical Student

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Nathan Esplin, Medical Student

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Ahsan Farooq

Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Olga Karasik

Internal Medicine, University of Central Florida College of Medicine