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Original article
peer-reviewed

Acute Pericarditis: Descriptive Study and Etiology Determination in a Predominantly African American Population



Abstract

INTRODUCTION

­­­Acute pericarditis is the most commonly encountered manifestation of pericardial disease (incidence: 0.2 percent to 0.5 percent in hospitalized patients). However, data regarding manifestations, workup, and the management of acute pericarditis in the African American population is lacking. This study aims to collect and analyze more clinical data related to acute pericarditis in this understudied population.

METHODOLOGY

We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients managed for acute pericarditis at a university hospital serving a predominantly African American population. A total of 78 charts were reviewed during the period of study from January 2011 to July 2016. Out of these, nine charts were excluded due to poor data. We descriptively analyzed data regarding presenting symptoms, underlying etiologies, co-morbidities, investigation results, management strategies, and prognoses.

RESULTS

We found an equal number of males and females in our study population. The most common comorbid conditions were hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus (in order of incidence). The most common presentation of symptomatic pericarditis consisted of chest pain, dyspnea, tachycardia, and tachypnea. Electrocardiogram (EKG) findings included diffuse ST elevation (15 percent) and sinus tachycardia (41 percent). Leukocytosis was seen in 15 percent of the patients. The most common etiology noted in our patient population was idiopathic and was treated with NSAIDS.

CONCLUSION

As compared to other populations, the incidence of uremic pericarditis and pericarditis secondary to cardiac etiologies is slightly higher in the African American population; however, the clinical presentation, examination and laboratory findings, as well as investigations, are remarkably similar. 



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Acute Pericarditis: Descriptive Study and Etiology Determination in a Predominantly African American Population


Author Information

Ahmad Awan Corresponding Author

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Fasil Tiruneh

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Priscilla Wessly

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Akbar Khan

Health Information Management, Howard University Hospital

Hasan Iftikhar

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Sydney Barned

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Daniel Larbi

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Acute Pericarditis: Descriptive Study and Etiology Determination in a Predominantly African American Population


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Acute Pericarditis: Descriptive Study and Etiology Determination in a Predominantly African American Population

  • Author Information
    Ahmad Awan Corresponding Author

    Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

    Fasil Tiruneh

    Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

    Priscilla Wessly

    Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

    Akbar Khan

    Health Information Management, Howard University Hospital

    Hasan Iftikhar

    Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

    Sydney Barned

    Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

    Daniel Larbi

    Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: July 06, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1431

    Cite this article as:

    Awan A, Tiruneh F, Wessly P, et al. (July 06, 2017) Acute Pericarditis: Descriptive Study and Etiology Determination in a Predominantly African American Population. Cureus 9(7): e1431. doi:10.7759/cureus.1431

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: June 22, 2017
    Peer review began: June 26, 2017
    Peer review concluded: June 26, 2017
    Published: July 06, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Awan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

­­­Acute pericarditis is the most commonly encountered manifestation of pericardial disease (incidence: 0.2 percent to 0.5 percent in hospitalized patients). However, data regarding manifestations, workup, and the management of acute pericarditis in the African American population is lacking. This study aims to collect and analyze more clinical data related to acute pericarditis in this understudied population.

METHODOLOGY

We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients managed for acute pericarditis at a university hospital serving a predominantly African American population. A total of 78 charts were reviewed during the period of study from January 2011 to July 2016. Out of these, nine charts were excluded due to poor data. We descriptively analyzed data regarding presenting symptoms, underlying etiologies, co-morbidities, investigation results, management strategies, and prognoses.

RESULTS

We found an equal number of males and females in our study population. The most common comorbid conditions were hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus (in order of incidence). The most common presentation of symptomatic pericarditis consisted of chest pain, dyspnea, tachycardia, and tachypnea. Electrocardiogram (EKG) findings included diffuse ST elevation (15 percent) and sinus tachycardia (41 percent). Leukocytosis was seen in 15 percent of the patients. The most common etiology noted in our patient population was idiopathic and was treated with NSAIDS.

CONCLUSION

As compared to other populations, the incidence of uremic pericarditis and pericarditis secondary to cardiac etiologies is slightly higher in the African American population; however, the clinical presentation, examination and laboratory findings, as well as investigations, are remarkably similar. 



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Ahmad Awan, M.D., Resident Physician

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

For correspondence:
aawan@huhosp.org

Fasil Tiruneh, M.D.

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Priscilla Wessly, M.D.

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Akbar Khan

Health Information Management, Howard University Hospital

Hasan Iftikhar

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Sydney Barned

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Daniel Larbi

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Ahmad Awan, M.D., Resident Physician

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

For correspondence:
aawan@huhosp.org

Fasil Tiruneh, M.D.

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Priscilla Wessly, M.D.

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Akbar Khan

Health Information Management, Howard University Hospital

Hasan Iftikhar

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Sydney Barned

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital

Daniel Larbi

Department of Internal Medicine, Howard University Hospital