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Case report
peer-reviewed

Palliative Care Options for a Young Adult Patient with a Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma



Abstract

Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are rare but devastating brain tumors that occur primarily in children. These gliomas have poor prognoses and present options focus on palliation of symptoms and prolongation of life. Here, we present a case of a 16-year-old female diagnosed with a DIPG whose age group has been mostly left out of discussions regarding psychosocial support options. This report is meant to start a conversation about the different support options available at our institution that have shown promising results in the literature for palliative care applications. These options can include camps for patients with brain tumors, psychological counseling, the Ronald McDonald House, and other psychosocial programs. Many of these programs can be tailored to meet the specific needs of adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients and will hopefully be integrated into a comprehensive palliative care regimen in future studies.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Palliative Care Options for a Young Adult Patient with a Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma


Author Information

Julian Sison Corresponding Author

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Hung Tran

Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles

Ashley Margol

Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles

Nishant Tiwari

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles

Karla M. Garcia

Clinical Social Work, Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Jennifer Cotter

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine; Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles

Erin Kiehna

Department of Neurosurgery, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine of Usc, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

Arthur J. Olch

Department of Radiation Oncology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth Wong

Department of Radiation Oncology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Palliative Care Options for a Young Adult Patient with a Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Palliative Care Options for a Young Adult Patient with a Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

  • Author Information
    Julian Sison Corresponding Author

    Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    Hung Tran

    Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles

    Ashley Margol

    Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles

    Nishant Tiwari

    Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles

    Karla M. Garcia

    Clinical Social Work, Children's Hospital Los Angeles

    Jennifer Cotter

    Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine; Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles

    Erin Kiehna

    Department of Neurosurgery, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine of Usc, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

    Arthur J. Olch

    Department of Radiation Oncology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

    Kenneth Wong

    Department of Radiation Oncology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: August 18, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1580

    Cite this article as:

    Sison J, Tran H, Margol A, et al. (August 18, 2017) Palliative Care Options for a Young Adult Patient with a Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma. Cureus 9(8): e1580. doi:10.7759/cureus.1580

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: July 03, 2017
    Peer review began: July 11, 2017
    Peer review concluded: August 08, 2017
    Published: August 18, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Sison et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are rare but devastating brain tumors that occur primarily in children. These gliomas have poor prognoses and present options focus on palliation of symptoms and prolongation of life. Here, we present a case of a 16-year-old female diagnosed with a DIPG whose age group has been mostly left out of discussions regarding psychosocial support options. This report is meant to start a conversation about the different support options available at our institution that have shown promising results in the literature for palliative care applications. These options can include camps for patients with brain tumors, psychological counseling, the Ronald McDonald House, and other psychosocial programs. Many of these programs can be tailored to meet the specific needs of adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients and will hopefully be integrated into a comprehensive palliative care regimen in future studies.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Julian Sison, Medical Student

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

For correspondence:
js2217@rwjms.rutgers.edu

Hung Tran

Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles

Ashley Margol

Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles

Nishant Tiwari

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles

Karla M. Garcia, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C

Clinical Social Work, Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Jennifer Cotter

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine; Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles

Erin Kiehna

Department of Neurosurgery, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine of Usc, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

Arthur J. Olch

Department of Radiation Oncology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth Wong

Department of Radiation Oncology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Julian Sison, Medical Student

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

For correspondence:
js2217@rwjms.rutgers.edu

Hung Tran

Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles

Ashley Margol

Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases, Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles

Nishant Tiwari

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles

Karla M. Garcia, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C

Clinical Social Work, Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Jennifer Cotter

Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine; Department of Pathology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles

Erin Kiehna

Department of Neurosurgery, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Keck School of Medicine of Usc, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

Arthur J. Olch

Department of Radiation Oncology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth Wong

Department of Radiation Oncology, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA