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Case report
peer-reviewed

Giant Cervical Goiter With Posterior Mediastinal Extension



Abstract

Most cervico-mediastinal goiters are situated in the anterior mediastinal compartment, but according to the literature, 10–15 percent of them are located in the posterior mediastinum. Although most anterior mediastinal goiters can be removed by using the transcervical approach, cervico-mediastinal goiters in the posterior mediastinal may require additional extracervical incisions. We report the case of a huge cervico-mediastinal goiter extending from the neck retrotracheally to the posterior mediastinum. Surgical removal is the treatment of choice in such cases. We performed an operation using a transcervical and right posterolateral thoracotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a large toxic goiter. The patient recovered well and was discharged in one week. While most retrosternal goiters can be resected through a transcervical approach, those extending beyond the aortic arch are better dealt with by either sternotomy or thoracotomy. This report describes the use of transcervical and posterolateral thoracotomy with an excellent postoperative result.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Giant Cervical Goiter With Posterior Mediastinal Extension


Author Information

Ashraf Zahra Corresponding Author

Head of Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Shebin El Kom Teaching Hospital

Osama Abdallah

MD, General Surgery, Shebin El Kom Teaching Hospital

Gamal A. Farag

MD, Assistant Professor Cardiothoracic Surgery, Al-azhar University, Damitta Branch


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Giant Cervical Goiter With Posterior Mediastinal Extension


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Giant Cervical Goiter With Posterior Mediastinal Extension

  • Author Information
    Ashraf Zahra Corresponding Author

    Head of Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Shebin El Kom Teaching Hospital

    Osama Abdallah

    MD, General Surgery, Shebin El Kom Teaching Hospital

    Gamal A. Farag

    MD, Assistant Professor Cardiothoracic Surgery, Al-azhar University, Damitta Branch


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: July 10, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1450

    Cite this article as:

    Zahra A, Abdallah, Farag G A (July 10, 2017) Giant Cervical Goiter With Posterior Mediastinal Extension . Cureus 9(7): e1450. doi:10.7759/cureus.1450

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: June 17, 2017
    Peer review began: June 28, 2017
    Peer review concluded: June 29, 2017
    Published: July 10, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Zahra et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Most cervico-mediastinal goiters are situated in the anterior mediastinal compartment, but according to the literature, 10–15 percent of them are located in the posterior mediastinum. Although most anterior mediastinal goiters can be removed by using the transcervical approach, cervico-mediastinal goiters in the posterior mediastinal may require additional extracervical incisions. We report the case of a huge cervico-mediastinal goiter extending from the neck retrotracheally to the posterior mediastinum. Surgical removal is the treatment of choice in such cases. We performed an operation using a transcervical and right posterolateral thoracotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a large toxic goiter. The patient recovered well and was discharged in one week. While most retrosternal goiters can be resected through a transcervical approach, those extending beyond the aortic arch are better dealt with by either sternotomy or thoracotomy. This report describes the use of transcervical and posterolateral thoracotomy with an excellent postoperative result.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Ashraf Zahra

Head of Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Shebin El Kom Teaching Hospital

For correspondence:
zahrah2001@hotmail.com

Osama Abdallah

MD, General Surgery, Shebin El Kom Teaching Hospital

Gamal A. Farag

MD, Assistant Professor Cardiothoracic Surgery, Al-azhar University, Damitta Branch

Ashraf Zahra

Head of Cardiothoracic Surgery Department, Shebin El Kom Teaching Hospital

For correspondence:
zahrah2001@hotmail.com

Osama Abdallah

MD, General Surgery, Shebin El Kom Teaching Hospital

Gamal A. Farag

MD, Assistant Professor Cardiothoracic Surgery, Al-azhar University, Damitta Branch