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Case report
peer-reviewed

Belly Dancer's Dyskinesia: A Glimpse of a Rare Phenomenon



Abstract

Belly dancer's dyskinesia (BDD) is an extremely rare manifestation consisting of involuntary and repetitive rhythmic movements of the abdominal wall. These movements cannot be voluntarily suppressed but may be influenced by respiratory maneuvers. Investigations such as spinal cord and abdominal imaging usually fail to reveal any local abnormalities to explain the movement disorder.

A 23-year-old male presented with sudden onset of undulating movements of the abdominal wall for the last two months after he took domperidone. There was no associated pain or effect of respiration. The movements used to subside during sleep. His radiological and hematological evaluations were inconclusive. The movements, however, subsided after administration of promethazine and clonazepam.

The cause of BDD varies, making diagnosis difficult. One of the causes being drug induced but it has never been reported earlier by domperidone. Also, our report provides a possible way to manage BDD by clonazepam and promethazine.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Belly Dancer's Dyskinesia: A Glimpse of a Rare Phenomenon


Author Information

Ashutosh Gupta Corresponding Author

Neurology, Institute of Human Behavior and Allied Sciences, Delhi

Suman Kushwaha

Neurology, Institute of Human Behavior and Allied Sciences, Delhi


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

Acknowledgements

I would like to acknowledge Mr. S. M. Gupta, my father, and mentor for providing useful directions in making this report


Case report
peer-reviewed

Belly Dancer's Dyskinesia: A Glimpse of a Rare Phenomenon


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Belly Dancer's Dyskinesia: A Glimpse of a Rare Phenomenon

  • Author Information
    Ashutosh Gupta Corresponding Author

    Neurology, Institute of Human Behavior and Allied Sciences, Delhi

    Suman Kushwaha

    Neurology, Institute of Human Behavior and Allied Sciences, Delhi


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements

    I would like to acknowledge Mr. S. M. Gupta, my father, and mentor for providing useful directions in making this report


    Article Information

    Published: July 11, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1457

    Cite this article as:

    Gupta A, Kushwaha S (July 11, 2017) Belly Dancer's Dyskinesia: A Glimpse of a Rare Phenomenon. Cureus 9(7): e1457. doi:10.7759/cureus.1457

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: May 30, 2017
    Peer review began: June 16, 2017
    Peer review concluded: July 01, 2017
    Published: July 11, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Gupta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Belly dancer's dyskinesia (BDD) is an extremely rare manifestation consisting of involuntary and repetitive rhythmic movements of the abdominal wall. These movements cannot be voluntarily suppressed but may be influenced by respiratory maneuvers. Investigations such as spinal cord and abdominal imaging usually fail to reveal any local abnormalities to explain the movement disorder.

A 23-year-old male presented with sudden onset of undulating movements of the abdominal wall for the last two months after he took domperidone. There was no associated pain or effect of respiration. The movements used to subside during sleep. His radiological and hematological evaluations were inconclusive. The movements, however, subsided after administration of promethazine and clonazepam.

The cause of BDD varies, making diagnosis difficult. One of the causes being drug induced but it has never been reported earlier by domperidone. Also, our report provides a possible way to manage BDD by clonazepam and promethazine.



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Ashutosh Gupta

Neurology, Institute of Human Behavior and Allied Sciences, Delhi

For correspondence:
drashutosh.gupta24@gmail.com

Suman Kushwaha

Neurology, Institute of Human Behavior and Allied Sciences, Delhi

Ashutosh Gupta

Neurology, Institute of Human Behavior and Allied Sciences, Delhi

For correspondence:
drashutosh.gupta24@gmail.com

Suman Kushwaha

Neurology, Institute of Human Behavior and Allied Sciences, Delhi