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Original article
peer-reviewed

The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford’s Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound



Abstract

Point-of-care ultrasound is a critical component of graduate medical training in emergency medicine. Innovation in ultrasound teaching methods is greatly needed to keep up with a changing medical landscape. A field-wide trend promoting simulation and technology-enhanced learning is underway in an effort to improve patient care, as well as patient safety. In an effort to both motivate students and increase their skill retention, training methods are shifting towards a friendly competition model and are gaining popularity nationwide. In line with this emerging trend, Stanford incorporated the Sound Games – an educational ultrasound event with a distinctly competitive thread – within its existing two-day point-of-care ultrasound orientation course for emergency medicine interns. In this study, we demonstrate successful implementation of the orientation program, significant learning gains in participants, and overall student satisfaction with the course.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford’s Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound


Author Information

Viveta Lobo Corresponding Author

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Andrew Q. Stromberg

Emergency Medicine, Georgetown Medical School

Peter Rosston

Chemistry, Washington University in St. Louis


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Stanford IRB issued approval 38214. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Original article
peer-reviewed

The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford’s Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound


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Original article
peer-reviewed

The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford’s Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound

Viveta Lobo">Viveta Lobo , Andrew Q. Stromberg">Andrew Q. Stromberg, Peter Rosston">Peter Rosston

  • Author Information
    Viveta Lobo Corresponding Author

    Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

    Andrew Q. Stromberg

    Emergency Medicine, Georgetown Medical School

    Peter Rosston

    Chemistry, Washington University in St. Louis


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Stanford IRB issued approval 38214. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 18, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1699

    Cite this article as:

    Lobo V, Stromberg A Q, Rosston P (September 18, 2017) The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford’s Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound. Cureus 9(9): e1699. doi:10.7759/cureus.1699

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: June 09, 2017
    Peer review began: June 15, 2017
    Peer review concluded: August 21, 2017
    Published: September 18, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Lobo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Point-of-care ultrasound is a critical component of graduate medical training in emergency medicine. Innovation in ultrasound teaching methods is greatly needed to keep up with a changing medical landscape. A field-wide trend promoting simulation and technology-enhanced learning is underway in an effort to improve patient care, as well as patient safety. In an effort to both motivate students and increase their skill retention, training methods are shifting towards a friendly competition model and are gaining popularity nationwide. In line with this emerging trend, Stanford incorporated the Sound Games – an educational ultrasound event with a distinctly competitive thread – within its existing two-day point-of-care ultrasound orientation course for emergency medicine interns. In this study, we demonstrate successful implementation of the orientation program, significant learning gains in participants, and overall student satisfaction with the course.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Viveta Lobo, M.D.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

For correspondence:
vlobo@stanford.edu

Andrew Q. Stromberg, Medical Student

Emergency Medicine, Georgetown Medical School

Peter Rosston, Undergraduate Researcher

Chemistry, Washington University in St. Louis

Viveta Lobo, M.D.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

For correspondence:
vlobo@stanford.edu

Andrew Q. Stromberg, Medical Student

Emergency Medicine, Georgetown Medical School

Peter Rosston, Undergraduate Researcher

Chemistry, Washington University in St. Louis