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Case report
peer-reviewed

Sporadic Meningioangiomatosis: A Series of Three Pediatric Cases



Abstract

Meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare benign, hamartomatous lesion within the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Three percent of intractable epileptic patients with tumor develop MA. It may be accompanied with neurofibromatosis type II, or it may occur sporadically.

Three patients, age range of 2-16 years old, presented with episodes of seizure. The patients demonstrated no family history or stigmata of neurofibromatosis type II. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was unremarkable for epileptiform activity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed enhancing lesions within the frontal gyrus, the anterior cingulate gyrus, and the parietal lobe. Incomplete resection led to recurrence in one patient, and later, intraoperative ultrasound was used to achieve total resection in another patient. Each patient was seizure free on follow-up, and managed with anti-epileptic medication.

Resection is the only curative treatment in 85% of MA cases. Complete resection is necessary for symptomatic treatment in cases of MA, as recurrence has been documented in this lesion. Intraoperative ultrasound is an effective imaging modality to ensure gross total resection of MA.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Sporadic Meningioangiomatosis: A Series of Three Pediatric Cases


Author Information

Raja Anand Corresponding Author

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Richard J. Garling

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Janet Poulik

Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Marko Sabolich

Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Dylan J. Goodrich

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Sandeep Sood

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Carolyn A. Harris

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Abilash Haridas

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Informed consent obtained. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Sporadic Meningioangiomatosis: A Series of Three Pediatric Cases


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Sporadic Meningioangiomatosis: A Series of Three Pediatric Cases

  • Author Information
    Raja Anand Corresponding Author

    Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

    Richard J. Garling

    Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

    Janet Poulik

    Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine

    Marko Sabolich

    Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine

    Dylan J. Goodrich

    Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

    Sandeep Sood

    Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

    Carolyn A. Harris

    Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

    Abilash Haridas

    Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Informed consent obtained. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 01, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1640

    Cite this article as:

    Anand R, Garling R J, Poulik J, et al. (September 01, 2017) Sporadic Meningioangiomatosis: A Series of Three Pediatric Cases. Cureus 9(9): e1640. doi:10.7759/cureus.1640

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: April 16, 2017
    Peer review began: May 09, 2017
    Peer review concluded: August 25, 2017
    Published: September 01, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Anand et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Meningioangiomatosis (MA) is a rare benign, hamartomatous lesion within the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Three percent of intractable epileptic patients with tumor develop MA. It may be accompanied with neurofibromatosis type II, or it may occur sporadically.

Three patients, age range of 2-16 years old, presented with episodes of seizure. The patients demonstrated no family history or stigmata of neurofibromatosis type II. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was unremarkable for epileptiform activity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed enhancing lesions within the frontal gyrus, the anterior cingulate gyrus, and the parietal lobe. Incomplete resection led to recurrence in one patient, and later, intraoperative ultrasound was used to achieve total resection in another patient. Each patient was seizure free on follow-up, and managed with anti-epileptic medication.

Resection is the only curative treatment in 85% of MA cases. Complete resection is necessary for symptomatic treatment in cases of MA, as recurrence has been documented in this lesion. Intraoperative ultrasound is an effective imaging modality to ensure gross total resection of MA.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Raja Anand

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

For correspondence:
ranand@med.wayne.edu

Richard J. Garling

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Janet Poulik

Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Marko Sabolich

Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Dylan J. Goodrich

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Sandeep Sood

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Carolyn A. Harris

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Abilash Haridas

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Raja Anand

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

For correspondence:
ranand@med.wayne.edu

Richard J. Garling

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Janet Poulik

Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Marko Sabolich

Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Dylan J. Goodrich

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Sandeep Sood

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Carolyn A. Harris

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine

Abilash Haridas

Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine