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Review article
peer-reviewed

Pattern and Predictors of Unmet Supportive Care Needs in Cancer Patients



Abstract

The incidence of cancers is increasing and this is associated with an increase in the burden of the disease. Patients with cancer have to deal with reduced physical functioning, emotional instability, difficulty in concentrating, and an overall diminished feeling of well-being. This creates deficits that have not been well catered for by traditional cancer care, leading to an overall dissatisfaction with care and a reduced quality of life. This review aims at assessing the pattern of unmet needs in cancer patients and to provide information as to the factors that influence the perception of unmet needs. Studies directly focused on unmet needs in cancer patients which were retrieved from Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Public/Publisher Medline (PubMed), PsychINFO, Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), and Google Scholar; from the earliest records till 2016. Unmet needs in cancer patients have been measured with a wide variety of tools, with the supportive care needs survey (SCNS) being the most commonly used as a result of its strong psychometric properties, ease of use, responsiveness, and its coverage of the major domains of unmet needs. The most common unmet needs were in the domains of health system and information, psychological, and physical and daily living. These needs are influenced by sociodemographic factors such as age, sex, marital status, income level; and clinical factors such as location of cancer, stage of disease, and tumor size. It is clear that cancer patients experience a wide range of unmet supportive needs, for which solutions need to be devised in order to improve the supportive care services for these patients and their overall quality of life.



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Review article
peer-reviewed

Pattern and Predictors of Unmet Supportive Care Needs in Cancer Patients


Author Information

Paul T. Okediji Corresponding Author

Research & Development, Sebeccly Cancer Center, Lagos

Omolola Salako

Department of Radiotherapy, Lagos University Teaching Hospital

Olamijulo O. Fatiregun

Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Review article
peer-reviewed

Pattern and Predictors of Unmet Supportive Care Needs in Cancer Patients


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Review article
peer-reviewed

Pattern and Predictors of Unmet Supportive Care Needs in Cancer Patients

  • Author Information
    Paul T. Okediji Corresponding Author

    Research & Development, Sebeccly Cancer Center, Lagos

    Omolola Salako

    Department of Radiotherapy, Lagos University Teaching Hospital

    Olamijulo O. Fatiregun

    Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: May 09, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1234

    Cite this article as:

    Okediji P T, Salako O, Fatiregun O O (May 09, 2017) Pattern and Predictors of Unmet Supportive Care Needs in Cancer Patients. Cureus 9(5): e1234. doi:10.7759/cureus.1234

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: February 16, 2017
    Peer review began: April 20, 2017
    Peer review concluded: May 07, 2017
    Published: May 09, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Okediji et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

The incidence of cancers is increasing and this is associated with an increase in the burden of the disease. Patients with cancer have to deal with reduced physical functioning, emotional instability, difficulty in concentrating, and an overall diminished feeling of well-being. This creates deficits that have not been well catered for by traditional cancer care, leading to an overall dissatisfaction with care and a reduced quality of life. This review aims at assessing the pattern of unmet needs in cancer patients and to provide information as to the factors that influence the perception of unmet needs. Studies directly focused on unmet needs in cancer patients which were retrieved from Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Public/Publisher Medline (PubMed), PsychINFO, Excerpta Medica database (EMBASE), and Google Scholar; from the earliest records till 2016. Unmet needs in cancer patients have been measured with a wide variety of tools, with the supportive care needs survey (SCNS) being the most commonly used as a result of its strong psychometric properties, ease of use, responsiveness, and its coverage of the major domains of unmet needs. The most common unmet needs were in the domains of health system and information, psychological, and physical and daily living. These needs are influenced by sociodemographic factors such as age, sex, marital status, income level; and clinical factors such as location of cancer, stage of disease, and tumor size. It is clear that cancer patients experience a wide range of unmet supportive needs, for which solutions need to be devised in order to improve the supportive care services for these patients and their overall quality of life.



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Paul T. Okediji, M.D.

Research & Development, Sebeccly Cancer Center, Lagos

For correspondence:
chnovpaul@gmail.com

Omolola Salako

Department of Radiotherapy, Lagos University Teaching Hospital

Olamijulo O. Fatiregun

Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital

Paul T. Okediji, M.D.

Research & Development, Sebeccly Cancer Center, Lagos

For correspondence:
chnovpaul@gmail.com

Omolola Salako

Department of Radiotherapy, Lagos University Teaching Hospital

Olamijulo O. Fatiregun

Department of Psychiatry, Lagos University Teaching Hospital