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Case report
peer-reviewed

Bilateral Retinal Detachments Associated with Inversion Table Therapy



Abstract

To report a case of sequential bilateral inferior retinal detachments secondary to inversion table therapy.

A 67-year-old-male developed inferior rhegmatoegnous retinal detachments (RRD) in both eyes on two different occasions with the use of inversion therapeutic tables.

Various predisposing factors have been documented for RRD such as previous cataract surgery, peripheral retinal degenerations, high myopia, history of previous retinal detachments and direct ocular trauma. The authors report here a case of inferior retinal detachments associated with the use of inversion therapy. Physical therapists, physical medicine rehabilitation physicians, and retinal specialists need be aware of this potential complication.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Bilateral Retinal Detachments Associated with Inversion Table Therapy


Author Information

Valerie C. Lerebours

Ophthalmology, Howard University College of Medicine

Austin J. Rohl

University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Saad Shaikh Corresponding Author

Ophthalmology, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Ophthalmology, Howard University College of Medicine

Ophthalmology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Ophthalmology, Orlando Veterans Affairs Medical Center

Ophthalmology, Florida State University College of Medicine


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Bilateral Retinal Detachments Associated with Inversion Table Therapy


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Bilateral Retinal Detachments Associated with Inversion Table Therapy

  • Author Information
    Valerie C. Lerebours

    Ophthalmology, Howard University College of Medicine

    Austin J. Rohl

    University of Central Florida College of Medicine

    Saad Shaikh Corresponding Author

    Ophthalmology, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

    Ophthalmology, Howard University College of Medicine

    Ophthalmology, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

    Ophthalmology, Orlando Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    Ophthalmology, Florida State University College of Medicine


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: March 15, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1098

    Cite this article as:

    Lerebours V C, Rohl A J, Shaikh S (March 15, 2017) Bilateral Retinal Detachments Associated with Inversion Table Therapy. Cureus 9(3): e1098. doi:10.7759/cureus.1098

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: January 24, 2017
    Peer review began: February 15, 2017
    Peer review concluded: March 01, 2017
    Published: March 15, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Lerebours et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

To report a case of sequential bilateral inferior retinal detachments secondary to inversion table therapy.

A 67-year-old-male developed inferior rhegmatoegnous retinal detachments (RRD) in both eyes on two different occasions with the use of inversion therapeutic tables.

Various predisposing factors have been documented for RRD such as previous cataract surgery, peripheral retinal degenerations, high myopia, history of previous retinal detachments and direct ocular trauma. The authors report here a case of inferior retinal detachments associated with the use of inversion therapy. Physical therapists, physical medicine rehabilitation physicians, and retinal specialists need be aware of this potential complication.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Valerie C. Lerebours

Ophthalmology, Howard University College of Medicine

Austin J. Rohl

University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Saad Shaikh

Ophthalmology, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

For correspondence:
saad.shaikh@ucf.edu

Valerie C. Lerebours

Ophthalmology, Howard University College of Medicine

Austin J. Rohl

University of Central Florida College of Medicine

Saad Shaikh

Ophthalmology, University of Central Florida College of Medicine

For correspondence:
saad.shaikh@ucf.edu