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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Technical Report of the Use of a Novel Eye Tracking System to Measure Impairment Associated with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury



Abstract

This technical report details the results of an uncontrolled study of EyeGuide Focus, a 10-second concussion management tool which relies on eye tracking to determine the potential impairment of visual attention, an indicator often of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Essentially, people who can visually keep steady and accurate attention on a moving object in their environment likely suffer from no impairment. However, if after a potential mTBI event, subjects cannot keep attention on a moving object in a normal way as demonstrated on their previous healthy baseline tests. This may indicate possible neurological impairment. Now deployed at multiple locations across the United States, Focus (EyeGuide, Lubbock, Texas, United States) to date, has recorded more than 4,000 test scores. Our data analysis of these results shows the promise of Focus as a low-cost, ocular-based impairment test for assessing potential neurological impairment caused by mTBI in subjects ages eight and older. 



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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Technical Report of the Use of a Novel Eye Tracking System to Measure Impairment Associated with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury


Author Information

Michael Kelly Corresponding Author

Procare Medical Associates LLC, Sports Medicine


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Technical report
peer-reviewed

Technical Report of the Use of a Novel Eye Tracking System to Measure Impairment Associated with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury


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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Technical Report of the Use of a Novel Eye Tracking System to Measure Impairment Associated with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Author Information
    Michael Kelly Corresponding Author

    Procare Medical Associates LLC, Sports Medicine


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: May 15, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1251

    Cite this article as:

    Kelly M (May 15, 2017) Technical Report of the Use of a Novel Eye Tracking System to Measure Impairment Associated with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Cureus 9(5): e1251. doi:10.7759/cureus.1251

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: January 13, 2017
    Peer review began: January 28, 2017
    Peer review concluded: May 09, 2017
    Published: May 15, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Kelly. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

This technical report details the results of an uncontrolled study of EyeGuide Focus, a 10-second concussion management tool which relies on eye tracking to determine the potential impairment of visual attention, an indicator often of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Essentially, people who can visually keep steady and accurate attention on a moving object in their environment likely suffer from no impairment. However, if after a potential mTBI event, subjects cannot keep attention on a moving object in a normal way as demonstrated on their previous healthy baseline tests. This may indicate possible neurological impairment. Now deployed at multiple locations across the United States, Focus (EyeGuide, Lubbock, Texas, United States) to date, has recorded more than 4,000 test scores. Our data analysis of these results shows the promise of Focus as a low-cost, ocular-based impairment test for assessing potential neurological impairment caused by mTBI in subjects ages eight and older. 



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