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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Implantable Systems for Continuous Liquorpheresis and CSF Replacement



Abstract

Liquorpheresis (cerebrospinal fluid filtration) comprises a therapeutical approach that has been proposed to treat several neurological conditions where antibodies, inflammatory mediators, or abnormal peptides are the cause or play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Continuous or intermittent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) replacement may be an alternative approach not explored thus far.

Here, we review previous experiences in the use of liquorpheresis in autoimmune and degenerative neurological diseases. Then we describe previous technical reports  and provide some new innovations in order to design bidirectional CSF shunting systems that can be complemented either with a deposit of artificial CSF or with a filter of CSF, allowing CSF replacement or liquorpheresis respectively. Both options would lead to mechanical dilution of the patient’s CSF.



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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Implantable Systems for Continuous Liquorpheresis and CSF Replacement


Author Information

Manuel Menéndez González Corresponding Author

Neurology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias

Morphology and Cellular Biology, Universidad de Oviedo

Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma de Chile


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Technical report
peer-reviewed

Implantable Systems for Continuous Liquorpheresis and CSF Replacement


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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Implantable Systems for Continuous Liquorpheresis and CSF Replacement

  • Author Information
    Manuel Menéndez González Corresponding Author

    Neurology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias

    Morphology and Cellular Biology, Universidad de Oviedo

    Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Autónoma de Chile


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: February 10, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1022

    Cite this article as:

    Menéndez gonzález M (February 10, 2017) Implantable Systems for Continuous Liquorpheresis and CSF Replacement. Cureus 9(2): e1022. doi:10.7759/cureus.1022

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: November 19, 2016
    Peer review began: November 23, 2016
    Peer review concluded: January 28, 2017
    Published: February 10, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Menéndez González. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Liquorpheresis (cerebrospinal fluid filtration) comprises a therapeutical approach that has been proposed to treat several neurological conditions where antibodies, inflammatory mediators, or abnormal peptides are the cause or play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Continuous or intermittent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) replacement may be an alternative approach not explored thus far.

Here, we review previous experiences in the use of liquorpheresis in autoimmune and degenerative neurological diseases. Then we describe previous technical reports  and provide some new innovations in order to design bidirectional CSF shunting systems that can be complemented either with a deposit of artificial CSF or with a filter of CSF, allowing CSF replacement or liquorpheresis respectively. Both options would lead to mechanical dilution of the patient’s CSF.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Manuel Menéndez González

Neurology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias

For correspondence:
manuelmenendezgonzalez@gmail.com

Manuel Menéndez González

Neurology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias

For correspondence:
manuelmenendezgonzalez@gmail.com