"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

Margaret Mead
Review article
peer-reviewed

Fecal Myeloperoxidase as a Biomarker for Inflammatory Bowel Disease



Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition involving the inflammation of the colon and small intestine. IBD affects as many as 1.4 million people in the U.S. alone and costs the health care industry over $1.7 billion annually. Managing IBD normally requires invasive and often discomforting diagnostic tests. In an effort to alleviate the painful and costly nature of traditional diagnosis, there has been increasing research initiative focused on noninvasive biomarkers. PubMed, provided by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health, was utilized with the following search terms: 1) myeloperoxidase (MPO) 2), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and 3) neutrophils. The following terms were used interchangeably with search terms 1-3: 4) costs, 5) biomarkers, 6) review, and 7) etiology. In the context of IBD, myeloperoxidase (MPO), a lysosomal protein found in neutrophils, may serve as a viable biomarker for assessing disease status. Several studies demonstrated increased levels of neutrophils in patients with active IBD. Furthermore, studies have found significantly higher levels of MPO in patients with active IBD compared to patients without IBD as well as patients with inactive IBD. MPO is also expressed in higher concentrations in patients with more severe forms of IBD. When measuring treatment efficacy, MPO levels are indicative of the quality of response. MPO may serve as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in assessing IBD status. 



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

Already a member? Login.



Review article
peer-reviewed

Fecal Myeloperoxidase as a Biomarker for Inflammatory Bowel Disease


Author Information

David R. Hansberry

Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals

Kush Shah

Gastroenterology, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Prateek Agarwal Corresponding Author

Neurosurgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Nitin Agarwal

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Review article
peer-reviewed

Fecal Myeloperoxidase as a Biomarker for Inflammatory Bowel Disease


Figures etc.

Share
Review article
peer-reviewed

Fecal Myeloperoxidase as a Biomarker for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

  • Author Information
    David R. Hansberry

    Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals

    Kush Shah

    Gastroenterology, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine

    Prateek Agarwal Corresponding Author

    Neurosurgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

    Nitin Agarwal

    Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: January 31, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1004

    Cite this article as:

    Hansberry D R, Shah K, Agarwal P, et al. (January 31, 2017) Fecal Myeloperoxidase as a Biomarker for Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Cureus 9(1): e1004. doi:10.7759/cureus.1004

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: July 31, 2016
    Peer review began: August 03, 2016
    Peer review concluded: January 28, 2017
    Published: January 31, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Hansberry et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition involving the inflammation of the colon and small intestine. IBD affects as many as 1.4 million people in the U.S. alone and costs the health care industry over $1.7 billion annually. Managing IBD normally requires invasive and often discomforting diagnostic tests. In an effort to alleviate the painful and costly nature of traditional diagnosis, there has been increasing research initiative focused on noninvasive biomarkers. PubMed, provided by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM) at the National Institutes of Health, was utilized with the following search terms: 1) myeloperoxidase (MPO) 2), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and 3) neutrophils. The following terms were used interchangeably with search terms 1-3: 4) costs, 5) biomarkers, 6) review, and 7) etiology. In the context of IBD, myeloperoxidase (MPO), a lysosomal protein found in neutrophils, may serve as a viable biomarker for assessing disease status. Several studies demonstrated increased levels of neutrophils in patients with active IBD. Furthermore, studies have found significantly higher levels of MPO in patients with active IBD compared to patients without IBD as well as patients with inactive IBD. MPO is also expressed in higher concentrations in patients with more severe forms of IBD. When measuring treatment efficacy, MPO levels are indicative of the quality of response. MPO may serve as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in assessing IBD status. 



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

Already a member? Login.



David R. Hansberry

Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals

Kush Shah

Gastroenterology, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Prateek Agarwal

Neurosurgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

For correspondence:
pagarwal130@gmail.com

Nitin Agarwal

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

David R. Hansberry

Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals

Kush Shah

Gastroenterology, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine

Prateek Agarwal

Neurosurgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

For correspondence:
pagarwal130@gmail.com

Nitin Agarwal

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center