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Case report
peer-reviewed

Diagnosis and Management of Cervical Thymic Cysts in Children



Abstract

We present the case of a 10-year-old boy with the sudden onset of a large, painless left neck mass. Findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy suggest a cystic lesion, most likely of thymic origin. Cervical thymic cysts are a rare form of cervical mass, which are easily overlooked in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with painless neck masses. A combination of CT and MRI investigations can be helpful in differentiating thymic cysts from other congenital and neoplastic masses, but the definitive diagnosis of thymic cyst requires histopathological documentation of thymic tissue. Surgical excision is considered the management of choice for thymic cysts, and no cases of postoperative recurrence have been reported.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Diagnosis and Management of Cervical Thymic Cysts in Children


Author Information

Joshua J. Sturm Corresponding Author

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

Medical Scientist Training Program, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Kavita Dedhia

Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine

David H. Chi

Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children’s Hospital of UPMC


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Verbal consent was obtained from the patient's family for the publication of this manuscript. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Diagnosis and Management of Cervical Thymic Cysts in Children


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Diagnosis and Management of Cervical Thymic Cysts in Children

Joshua J. Sturm">Joshua J. Sturm , Kavita Dedhia">Kavita Dedhia, David H. Chi">David H. Chi

  • Author Information
    Joshua J. Sturm Corresponding Author

    Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

    Medical Scientist Training Program, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

    Kavita Dedhia

    Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine

    David H. Chi

    Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children’s Hospital of UPMC


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Verbal consent was obtained from the patient's family for the publication of this manuscript. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: January 11, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.973

    Cite this article as:

    Sturm J J, Dedhia K, Chi D H (January 11, 2017) Diagnosis and Management of Cervical Thymic Cysts in Children. Cureus 9(1): e973. doi:10.7759/cureus.973

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: July 29, 2016
    Peer review began: August 01, 2016
    Peer review concluded: January 08, 2017
    Published: January 11, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Sturm et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

We present the case of a 10-year-old boy with the sudden onset of a large, painless left neck mass. Findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy suggest a cystic lesion, most likely of thymic origin. Cervical thymic cysts are a rare form of cervical mass, which are easily overlooked in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with painless neck masses. A combination of CT and MRI investigations can be helpful in differentiating thymic cysts from other congenital and neoplastic masses, but the definitive diagnosis of thymic cyst requires histopathological documentation of thymic tissue. Surgical excision is considered the management of choice for thymic cysts, and no cases of postoperative recurrence have been reported.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Joshua J. Sturm

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

For correspondence:
jjs149@pitt.edu

Kavita Dedhia

Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine

David H. Chi

Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children’s Hospital of UPMC

Joshua J. Sturm

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center

For correspondence:
jjs149@pitt.edu

Kavita Dedhia

Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine

David H. Chi

Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Children’s Hospital of UPMC