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Original article
peer-reviewed

Resuscitation of the Newborn: Simulating for Confidence



Abstract

Introduction

Non-pediatric trainees working in pediatrics in the UK are expected to attend newborn deliveries and provide initial newborn life support if needed. In Swindon, new junior doctors receive a 90-minute teaching session at the start of their pediatrics rotation, but the content has not previously been standardized, and it may be several weeks before a doctor attends a newborn delivery. Thus, the confidence and competence in newborn resuscitation of doctors attending deliveries can vastly vary.

Methods

A standardized teaching package was developed as part of the pediatrics induction program. This includes an interactive lecture on the physiology of the newborn, skills stations, and mini-simulations to consolidate skills. This is accompanied by a program of regular neonatal mini-simulations as part of the departmental morning teaching program. These sessions allow junior doctors to practice their skills in a safe, simulated environment and reinforce the newborn life support pathway.

Results

Qualitative and quantitative feedback was sought following delivery of the induction training session. Junior doctors were asked to rate their confidence before and after the induction session using Likert scales from 1 (least confident) to 5 (most confident). Median confidence in attending term deliveries increased from 2 (range 1 - 4) to 4 (2 - 5), P=0.008. There was evidence that confidence was maintained at one month following induction.

Conclusions

A simulation program has been successful at improving confidence among junior doctors in attending newborn deliveries. This has the potential to improve patient care and trainees’ experiences of their pediatrics placement.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Resuscitation of the Newborn: Simulating for Confidence


Author Information

Phil J. Peacock Corresponding Author

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

Anna Woodman

The Academy, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

Wendy McCay

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

Sarah E. Bates

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. NHS Research Ethics Committee approval was not required. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Resuscitation of the Newborn: Simulating for Confidence


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Resuscitation of the Newborn: Simulating for Confidence

Phil J. Peacock">Phil J. Peacock , Anna Woodman">Anna Woodman, Wendy McCay">Wendy McCay, Sarah E. Bates">Sarah E. Bates

  • Author Information
    Phil J. Peacock Corresponding Author

    Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

    Anna Woodman

    The Academy, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

    Wendy McCay

    Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

    Sarah E. Bates

    Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. NHS Research Ethics Committee approval was not required. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 20, 2016

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.790

    Cite this article as:

    Peacock P J, Woodman A, Mccay W, et al. (September 20, 2016) Resuscitation of the Newborn: Simulating for Confidence. Cureus 8(9): e790. doi:10.7759/cureus.790

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: August 02, 2016
    Peer review began: August 03, 2016
    Peer review concluded: September 15, 2016
    Published: September 20, 2016

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2016
    Peacock et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Introduction

Non-pediatric trainees working in pediatrics in the UK are expected to attend newborn deliveries and provide initial newborn life support if needed. In Swindon, new junior doctors receive a 90-minute teaching session at the start of their pediatrics rotation, but the content has not previously been standardized, and it may be several weeks before a doctor attends a newborn delivery. Thus, the confidence and competence in newborn resuscitation of doctors attending deliveries can vastly vary.

Methods

A standardized teaching package was developed as part of the pediatrics induction program. This includes an interactive lecture on the physiology of the newborn, skills stations, and mini-simulations to consolidate skills. This is accompanied by a program of regular neonatal mini-simulations as part of the departmental morning teaching program. These sessions allow junior doctors to practice their skills in a safe, simulated environment and reinforce the newborn life support pathway.

Results

Qualitative and quantitative feedback was sought following delivery of the induction training session. Junior doctors were asked to rate their confidence before and after the induction session using Likert scales from 1 (least confident) to 5 (most confident). Median confidence in attending term deliveries increased from 2 (range 1 - 4) to 4 (2 - 5), P=0.008. There was evidence that confidence was maintained at one month following induction.

Conclusions

A simulation program has been successful at improving confidence among junior doctors in attending newborn deliveries. This has the potential to improve patient care and trainees’ experiences of their pediatrics placement.



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

Already a member? Login.



Phil J. Peacock

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

For correspondence:
phil.peacock@bristol.ac.uk

Anna Woodman

The Academy, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

Wendy McCay

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

Sarah E. Bates

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

Phil J. Peacock

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

For correspondence:
phil.peacock@bristol.ac.uk

Anna Woodman

The Academy, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

Wendy McCay

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon

Sarah E. Bates

Department of Paediatrics, Great Western Hospital, Swindon