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Case report
peer-reviewed

Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound



Abstract

We report a cardiac mass detected by point-of-care ultrasound performed within the emergency department on a 65-year-old male with thymic cancer who presented with chronic cough and fever. Results from the initial emergency workup, which included blood tests, urinalysis, and a computerized tomography with angiography scan with venous phasing of the chest, did not result in a definitive diagnosis. A point-of-care echocardiogram was performed to evaluate for possible infective endocarditis, but alternatively identified a large mass in the right atria and ventricle. The mass was later confirmed to be metastatic tumor from the patient’s known thymic cancer. This case emphasizes the vital role ultrasound can play in the acute care setting.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound


Author Information

Elizabeth Kaufman

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Michelle Hunter-Behrend

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Eric Leroux

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Laleh Gharahbaghian

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Viveta Lobo Corresponding Author

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

Acknowledgements

Special thanks to Stacey Kimball and Anne Strehlow for their help with manuscript preparation.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound

  • Author Information
    Elizabeth Kaufman

    Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

    Michelle Hunter-Behrend

    Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

    Eric Leroux

    Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

    Laleh Gharahbaghian

    Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

    Viveta Lobo Corresponding Author

    Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements

    Special thanks to Stacey Kimball and Anne Strehlow for their help with manuscript preparation.


    Article Information

    Published: August 04, 2016

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.724

    Cite this article as:

    Kaufman E, Hunter-behrend M, Leroux E, et al. (August 04, 2016) Thymic Tumor Extension into the Heart, a Rare Finding Found by Point-of-Care Ultrasound . Cureus 8(8): e724. doi:10.7759/cureus.724

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: June 17, 2016
    Peer review began: July 08, 2016
    Peer review concluded: July 21, 2016
    Published: August 04, 2016

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2016
    Kaufman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

We report a cardiac mass detected by point-of-care ultrasound performed within the emergency department on a 65-year-old male with thymic cancer who presented with chronic cough and fever. Results from the initial emergency workup, which included blood tests, urinalysis, and a computerized tomography with angiography scan with venous phasing of the chest, did not result in a definitive diagnosis. A point-of-care echocardiogram was performed to evaluate for possible infective endocarditis, but alternatively identified a large mass in the right atria and ventricle. The mass was later confirmed to be metastatic tumor from the patient’s known thymic cancer. This case emphasizes the vital role ultrasound can play in the acute care setting.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Elizabeth Kaufman

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Michelle Hunter-Behrend

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Eric Leroux

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Laleh Gharahbaghian

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Viveta Lobo, M.D.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

For correspondence:
vlobo@stanford.edu

Elizabeth Kaufman

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Michelle Hunter-Behrend

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Eric Leroux

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Laleh Gharahbaghian

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Viveta Lobo, M.D.

Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

For correspondence:
vlobo@stanford.edu