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Original article
peer-reviewed

A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies



Abstract

The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship.

The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course.

Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.2, 0.4%) and providing signout (2.5 vs. 3.9 (5-point scale) p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.6, 2.3). They did not show an improvement in communication with a parent. Participants demonstrated an increase in self-reported preparedness for all targeted skills, except for obtaining consults and interprofessional communication. There was no increase in reported overall preparedness. All participants agreed with the statements, “The facilitators presented the material in an effective manner,” “I took away ideas I plan to implement in internship,” and “I think all students should participate in a similar experience.” When asked to assess the usefulness of individual modules, all except order writing received a mean Likert score > 4.

A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills required for pediatric-related residencies was well received and led to improved performance of targeted skills and increased self-reported preparedness in many targeted domains.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies


Author Information

Rebekah Burns Corresponding Author

Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital - University of Washington School of Medicine

Mark Adler

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Karen Mangold

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Jennifer Trainor

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago issued approval 2012-14872. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared the following conflicts of interest: Payment/services info: This project was supported by the Department of Pediatrics at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and the Richard Sarkin Foundation/ Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics. The authors have no financial disclosures to declare.

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the course faculty and staff, especially Justin Jeffers, MD, Adam Nicholson, MD, and Bonnie Mobley, RN, BSN for their contributions to the curriculum.


Original article
peer-reviewed

A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies


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Original article
peer-reviewed

A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies

  • Author Information
    Rebekah Burns Corresponding Author

    Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital - University of Washington School of Medicine

    Mark Adler

    Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

    Karen Mangold

    Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

    Jennifer Trainor

    Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago issued approval 2012-14872. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared the following conflicts of interest: Payment/services info: This project was supported by the Department of Pediatrics at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and the Richard Sarkin Foundation/ Council on Medical Student Education in Pediatrics. The authors have no financial disclosures to declare.

    Acknowledgements

    The authors would like to thank the course faculty and staff, especially Justin Jeffers, MD, Adam Nicholson, MD, and Bonnie Mobley, RN, BSN for their contributions to the curriculum.


    Article Information

    Published: February 09, 2016

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.488

    Cite this article as:

    Burns R, Adler M, Mangold K, et al. (February 09, 2016) A Brief Boot Camp for 4th-Year Medical Students Entering into Pediatric and Family Medicine Residencies. Cureus 8(2): e488. doi:10.7759/cureus.488

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: December 16, 2015
    Peer review began: January 05, 2016
    Peer review concluded: January 28, 2016
    Published: February 09, 2016

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2016
    Burns et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

The transition from medical student to intern is a challenging process characterized by a steep learning curve. Focused courses targeting skills necessary for success as a resident have increased self-perceived preparedness, confidence, and medical knowledge. Our aim was to create a brief educational intervention for 4th-year medical students entering pediatric, family practice, and medicine/pediatric residencies to target skills necessary for an internship.

The curriculum used a combination of didactic presentations, small group discussions, role-playing, facilitated debriefing, and simulation-based education. Participants completed an objective structured clinical exam requiring synthesis and application of multiple boot camp elements before and after the elective. Participants completed anonymous surveys assessing self-perceived preparedness for an internship, overall and in regards to specific skills, before the elective and after the course. Participants were asked to provide feedback about the course.

Using checklists to assess performance, students showed an improvement in performing infant lumbar punctures (47.2% vs 77.0%; p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.2, 0.4%) and providing signout (2.5 vs. 3.9 (5-point scale) p < 0.01, 95% CI for the difference 0.6, 2.3). They did not show an improvement in communication with a parent. Participants demonstrated an increase in self-reported preparedness for all targeted skills, except for obtaining consults and interprofessional communication. There was no increase in reported overall preparedness. All participants agreed with the statements, “The facilitators presented the material in an effective manner,” “I took away ideas I plan to implement in internship,” and “I think all students should participate in a similar experience.” When asked to assess the usefulness of individual modules, all except order writing received a mean Likert score > 4.

A focused boot camp addressing key knowledge and skills required for pediatric-related residencies was well received and led to improved performance of targeted skills and increased self-reported preparedness in many targeted domains.



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Rebekah Burns

Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital - University of Washington School of Medicine

For correspondence:
rebekah.burns@seattlechildrens.org

Mark Adler

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Karen Mangold

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Jennifer Trainor

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Rebekah Burns

Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital - University of Washington School of Medicine

For correspondence:
rebekah.burns@seattlechildrens.org

Mark Adler

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Karen Mangold

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA

Jennifer Trainor

Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA