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Original article
peer-reviewed

Burnout and Sleep Quality: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire-Based Study of Medical and Non-Medical Students in India



Abstract

Introduction

It is well documented that on entering college, students experience a multitude of changes in sleep habits. Very few studies have been conducted that explore sleep quality in Indian undergraduate students; fewer still study the effects of burnout in the same population. Medical students, in particular, are believed to be more stressed, sleep deprived, and burnt out than their non-medical peers.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted to study sleep disturbances and burnout in a sample of 214 Indian undergraduate students (112 medical, 102 non-medical). The instruments used to measure the sleep quality and burnout were the PSQI (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and OLBI (Oldenburg Burnout Inventory), respectively. Differences between continuous variables were analysed using Wilcox Mann Whitney U-tests. Bivariate Spearman’s rho correlations were done to identify correlations between the individual burnout components and the PSQI sleep quality components.

Results

Of the students surveyed, 62.6% were found to be poor sleepers with an average score of 6.45 ± 2.85. It was seen that 20% of the students (n = 43) slept less than five hours a day. Medical students, in particular, were found to have more poor sleep (72.9%) than their non-medical peers (51.9%; p < 0.001). Of the sampled women, 65.8% were poor sleepers, as compared to 62.1% of the sampled men, but the difference was not statistically significant. The average scores of the burnout dimensions were 2.43 ± 0.57 for exhaustion and 2.32 ± 0.53 for disengagement. Both exhaustion and disengagement correlated with PSQI sleep scores (Rho 0.21, p 0.001) and (Rho = 0.18, p = 0.008), respectively. The exhaustion dimension of burnout was higher in medical students (2.46 ± 0.55) than in non-medical students (2.38 ± 0.59), but was seen to correlate more with the PSQI sleep score in the non-medical group (Rho = 0.62, p < 0.001). The PSQI scores showed a weak but significant correlation with academic year (rho = -0.19, p = 0.004). Unlike the sleep scores, the burnout dimensions did not correlate well with the academic year.

Conclusions

Burnout and sleep quality are both uncommonly studied topics in India. Fostering a healthier and more proactive approach to tackling burnout and poor sleep quality may help unearth culture specific causes for some of the results we have demonstrated.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Burnout and Sleep Quality: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire-Based Study of Medical and Non-Medical Students in India


Author Information

Rohan Shad Corresponding Author

University College of Medical Sciences

Rajat Thawani

Internal Medicine Resident, Maimonides Medical Center

Clinical Associate In Oncology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, New Delhi

Research Associate In Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Ashish Goel

Internal Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared the following conflicts of interest: Payment/services info: This project was funded by the Indian council of medical research as part of the ICMR – STS program. Reference ID: 2013-02490.
.

Acknowledgements

This project was funded by the Indian Council of Medical Research as part of the ICMR – STS Program. Reference ID: 2013-02490.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Burnout and Sleep Quality: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire-Based Study of Medical and Non-Medical Students in India


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Burnout and Sleep Quality: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire-Based Study of Medical and Non-Medical Students in India

  • Author Information
    Rohan Shad Corresponding Author

    University College of Medical Sciences

    Rajat Thawani

    Internal Medicine Resident, Maimonides Medical Center

    Clinical Associate In Oncology, Indraprastha Apollo Hospital, New Delhi

    Research Associate In Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

    Ashish Goel

    Internal Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared the following conflicts of interest: Payment/services info: This project was funded by the Indian council of medical research as part of the ICMR – STS program. Reference ID: 2013-02490.
    .

    Acknowledgements

    This project was funded by the Indian Council of Medical Research as part of the ICMR – STS Program. Reference ID: 2013-02490.


    Article Information

    Published: October 21, 2015

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.361

    Cite this article as:

    Shad R, Thawani R, Goel A (October 21, 2015) Burnout and Sleep Quality: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire-Based Study of Medical and Non-Medical Students in India . Cureus 7(10): e361. doi:10.7759/cureus.361

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: September 07, 2015
    Peer review began: September 10, 2015
    Peer review concluded: October 18, 2015
    Published: October 21, 2015

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2015
    Shad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Introduction

It is well documented that on entering college, students experience a multitude of changes in sleep habits. Very few studies have been conducted that explore sleep quality in Indian undergraduate students; fewer still study the effects of burnout in the same population. Medical students, in particular, are believed to be more stressed, sleep deprived, and burnt out than their non-medical peers.

Methods

A cross-sectional study was conducted to study sleep disturbances and burnout in a sample of 214 Indian undergraduate students (112 medical, 102 non-medical). The instruments used to measure the sleep quality and burnout were the PSQI (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and OLBI (Oldenburg Burnout Inventory), respectively. Differences between continuous variables were analysed using Wilcox Mann Whitney U-tests. Bivariate Spearman’s rho correlations were done to identify correlations between the individual burnout components and the PSQI sleep quality components.

Results

Of the students surveyed, 62.6% were found to be poor sleepers with an average score of 6.45 ± 2.85. It was seen that 20% of the students (n = 43) slept less than five hours a day. Medical students, in particular, were found to have more poor sleep (72.9%) than their non-medical peers (51.9%; p < 0.001). Of the sampled women, 65.8% were poor sleepers, as compared to 62.1% of the sampled men, but the difference was not statistically significant. The average scores of the burnout dimensions were 2.43 ± 0.57 for exhaustion and 2.32 ± 0.53 for disengagement. Both exhaustion and disengagement correlated with PSQI sleep scores (Rho 0.21, p 0.001) and (Rho = 0.18, p = 0.008), respectively. The exhaustion dimension of burnout was higher in medical students (2.46 ± 0.55) than in non-medical students (2.38 ± 0.59), but was seen to correlate more with the PSQI sleep score in the non-medical group (Rho = 0.62, p < 0.001). The PSQI scores showed a weak but significant correlation with academic year (rho = -0.19, p = 0.004). Unlike the sleep scores, the burnout dimensions did not correlate well with the academic year.

Conclusions

Burnout and sleep quality are both uncommonly studied topics in India. Fostering a healthier and more proactive approach to tackling burnout and poor sleep quality may help unearth culture specific causes for some of the results we have demonstrated.



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Rohan Shad, M.D.

University College of Medical Sciences

For correspondence:
rohan.shad@gmail.com

Rajat Thawani, M.D., Resident Physician

Internal Medicine Resident, Maimonides Medical Center

Ashish Goel

Internal Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences

Rohan Shad, M.D.

University College of Medical Sciences

For correspondence:
rohan.shad@gmail.com

Rajat Thawani, M.D., Resident Physician

Internal Medicine Resident, Maimonides Medical Center

Ashish Goel

Internal Medicine, University College of Medical Sciences