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Original article
peer-reviewed

Simulation to Assist in the Selection Process of New Airway Equipment in a Children's Hospital



Abstract

Introduction: To provide an informed choice of equipment purchase, we sought to use simulation to allow medical providers an opportunity to evaluate two potential laryngoscopes.

Methods: The study followed a prospective, blinded comparison design. Participants were blinded to the laryngoscope brands by using alphabetic labels on the handles (“A” and “B”). Participants included a convenience sample of healthcare providers who perform intubation. Participants were allowed to perform intubation with the two laryngoscope brands on neonatal, child, and adolescent/adult airway simulators. After practicing with each of the two different laryngoscopes, participants completed an evaluation indicating their preference for one laryngoscope versus the other for each patient age group.

Results: Thirty-four healthcare providers participated in the study, including attendings, fellows, nurse practitioners, and transport team members from Neonatology, Pediatric Intensive Care, Anesthesiology, Emergency Medicine, Cardiac Intensive Care, and Otolaryngology. Participants overwhelmingly preferred brand ‘A’ (89%) over brand ‘B’ (11%).

Discussion: Providers overwhelmingly chose one laryngoscope over the other. Data from this evaluation were used to determine which of the two laryngoscope brands was purchased. Based on our experience, we feel other hospitals should consider the use of simulation to allow providers to examine, compare, and rate medical equipment prior to making purchasing decisions.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Simulation to Assist in the Selection Process of New Airway Equipment in a Children's Hospital


Author Information

Joan Roberts

Pediatric Critical Care, Seattle Children's Hospital

Taylor Sawyer Corresponding Author

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington

Donald Foubare

Respiratory Care, Seattle Children's Hospital

Jennifer Reid

Emergency Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital

Kimberly Stone

Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital

Don Stephanian

Learning and Simulation Center, Seattle Children's Hospital

Douglas Thompson

Anesthesia, Seattle Children's Hospital


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Seattle Children's Hospital issued approval IRB exempt. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the staff at Seattle Children's Hospital who participated in this study.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Simulation to Assist in the Selection Process of New Airway Equipment in a Children's Hospital


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Simulation to Assist in the Selection Process of New Airway Equipment in a Children's Hospital

  • Author Information
    Joan Roberts

    Pediatric Critical Care, Seattle Children's Hospital

    Taylor Sawyer Corresponding Author

    Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington

    Donald Foubare

    Respiratory Care, Seattle Children's Hospital

    Jennifer Reid

    Emergency Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital

    Kimberly Stone

    Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital

    Don Stephanian

    Learning and Simulation Center, Seattle Children's Hospital

    Douglas Thompson

    Anesthesia, Seattle Children's Hospital


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Seattle Children's Hospital issued approval IRB exempt. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements

    The authors would like to thank the staff at Seattle Children's Hospital who participated in this study.


    Article Information

    Published: September 24, 2015

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.331

    Cite this article as:

    Roberts J, Sawyer T, Foubare D, et al. (September 24, 2015) Simulation to Assist in the Selection Process of New Airway Equipment in a Children's Hospital. Cureus 7(9): e331. doi:10.7759/cureus.331

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: August 20, 2015
    Peer review began: August 24, 2015
    Peer review concluded: September 18, 2015
    Published: September 24, 2015

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2015
    Roberts et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Introduction: To provide an informed choice of equipment purchase, we sought to use simulation to allow medical providers an opportunity to evaluate two potential laryngoscopes.

Methods: The study followed a prospective, blinded comparison design. Participants were blinded to the laryngoscope brands by using alphabetic labels on the handles (“A” and “B”). Participants included a convenience sample of healthcare providers who perform intubation. Participants were allowed to perform intubation with the two laryngoscope brands on neonatal, child, and adolescent/adult airway simulators. After practicing with each of the two different laryngoscopes, participants completed an evaluation indicating their preference for one laryngoscope versus the other for each patient age group.

Results: Thirty-four healthcare providers participated in the study, including attendings, fellows, nurse practitioners, and transport team members from Neonatology, Pediatric Intensive Care, Anesthesiology, Emergency Medicine, Cardiac Intensive Care, and Otolaryngology. Participants overwhelmingly preferred brand ‘A’ (89%) over brand ‘B’ (11%).

Discussion: Providers overwhelmingly chose one laryngoscope over the other. Data from this evaluation were used to determine which of the two laryngoscope brands was purchased. Based on our experience, we feel other hospitals should consider the use of simulation to allow providers to examine, compare, and rate medical equipment prior to making purchasing decisions.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Joan Roberts

Pediatric Critical Care, Seattle Children's Hospital

Taylor Sawyer, D.O.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington

For correspondence:
tlsawyer@uw.edu

Donald Foubare

Respiratory Care, Seattle Children's Hospital

Jennifer Reid

Emergency Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital

Kimberly Stone

Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital

Don Stephanian

Learning and Simulation Center, Seattle Children's Hospital

Douglas Thompson

Anesthesia, Seattle Children's Hospital

Joan Roberts

Pediatric Critical Care, Seattle Children's Hospital

Taylor Sawyer, D.O.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington

For correspondence:
tlsawyer@uw.edu

Donald Foubare

Respiratory Care, Seattle Children's Hospital

Jennifer Reid

Emergency Medicine, Seattle Children's Hospital

Kimberly Stone

Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital

Don Stephanian

Learning and Simulation Center, Seattle Children's Hospital

Douglas Thompson

Anesthesia, Seattle Children's Hospital