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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Infant Trauma Management in the Emergency Department: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Exercise



Abstract

In a trauma situation, it is essential that emergency room physicians are able to think clearly, make decisions quickly and manage patients in a way consistent with their injuries. In order for emergency medicine residents to adequately develop the skills to deal with trauma situations, it is imperative that they have the opportunity to experience such scenarios in a controlled environment with aptly timed feedback. In the case of infant trauma, sensitivities have to be taken that are specific to pediatric medicine. The following describes a simulation session in which trainees were tasked with managing an infantile patient who had experienced a major trauma as a result of a single vehicle accident. The described simulation session utilized human patient simulators and was tailored to junior (year 1 and 2) emergency medicine residents.



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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Infant Trauma Management in the Emergency Department: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Exercise


Author Information

Sarah Mathieson

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Desmond Whalen

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Adam Dubrowski Corresponding Author

Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Marine Institute, Memorial University of Newfoundland


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

Acknowledgements

This project was supported by the Tuckamore Simulation Research Network and the Emergency Medicine Educational Committee, Memorial University of Newfoundland. The authors would like to thank Dr. Kevin Chan from the Janeway Pediatrics and Child Rehabilitation Center for guidance and resources.


Technical report
peer-reviewed

Infant Trauma Management in the Emergency Department: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Exercise


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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Infant Trauma Management in the Emergency Department: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Exercise

  • Author Information
    Sarah Mathieson

    Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

    Desmond Whalen

    Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

    Adam Dubrowski Corresponding Author

    Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics, Memorial University of Newfoundland

    Marine Institute, Memorial University of Newfoundland


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements

    This project was supported by the Tuckamore Simulation Research Network and the Emergency Medicine Educational Committee, Memorial University of Newfoundland. The authors would like to thank Dr. Kevin Chan from the Janeway Pediatrics and Child Rehabilitation Center for guidance and resources.


    Article Information

    Published: September 07, 2015

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.316

    Cite this article as:

    Mathieson S, Whalen D, Dubrowski A (September 07, 2015) Infant Trauma Management in the Emergency Department: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Exercise. Cureus 7(9): e316. doi:10.7759/cureus.316

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: August 12, 2015
    Peer review began: August 14, 2015
    Peer review concluded: August 26, 2015
    Published: September 07, 2015

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2015
    Mathieson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

In a trauma situation, it is essential that emergency room physicians are able to think clearly, make decisions quickly and manage patients in a way consistent with their injuries. In order for emergency medicine residents to adequately develop the skills to deal with trauma situations, it is imperative that they have the opportunity to experience such scenarios in a controlled environment with aptly timed feedback. In the case of infant trauma, sensitivities have to be taken that are specific to pediatric medicine. The following describes a simulation session in which trainees were tasked with managing an infantile patient who had experienced a major trauma as a result of a single vehicle accident. The described simulation session utilized human patient simulators and was tailored to junior (year 1 and 2) emergency medicine residents.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Sarah Mathieson

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Desmond Whalen

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Adam Dubrowski, Ph.D., Professor

Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics, Memorial University of Newfoundland

For correspondence:
adam.dubrowski@gmail.com

Sarah Mathieson

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Desmond Whalen

Emergency Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Adam Dubrowski, Ph.D., Professor

Emergency Medicine, Pediatrics, Memorial University of Newfoundland

For correspondence:
adam.dubrowski@gmail.com