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Original article
peer-reviewed

Premodern Transcendental Perspectives on the Missing Heritability Problem and Some Intelligence Conundrums



Abstract

The common premodern transcendental understanding of life is explored here as a basis for alternative explanations to some biological mysteries, in particular, a collection of intelligence-related phenomena, and more generally, the missing heritability problem (“transcendental” will be used herein in place of a number of existing terms including “transmigration” and “reincarnation”). An extended introduction considers possible carryover from previous lives as a complementary component of life and, specifically, as an additional vehicle for apparent heredity. This introduction also touches on two relevant examples - the innate spiritual or religious understandings of young children and the mysteries associated with monozygotic twins. The subsequent discussion section then considers a constellation of three intelligence-related mysteries - a childhood behavioral syndrome, the Einstein Syndrome; the somewhat overlapping phenomena of savants and prodigies; and then the observed rise in IQ’s or the Flynn Effect - which together with the inability to identify a significant DNA basis for the variations in intelligence, represent a significant challenge to the modern understanding of humans. Alternative explanations from the transcendental perspective are considered along the way.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Premodern Transcendental Perspectives on the Missing Heritability Problem and Some Intelligence Conundrums


Author Information

Ted Christopher Corresponding Author

Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound, University of Rochester


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Premodern Transcendental Perspectives on the Missing Heritability Problem and Some Intelligence Conundrums

  • Author Information
    Ted Christopher Corresponding Author

    Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound, University of Rochester


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: August 20, 2013

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.135

    Cite this article as:

    Christopher T (August 20, 2013) Premodern Transcendental Perspectives on the Missing Heritability Problem and Some Intelligence Conundrums. Cureus 5(8): e135. doi:10.7759/cureus.135

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: June 13, 2013
    Peer review began: June 14, 2013
    Published: August 20, 2013

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2013
    Christopher. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

The common premodern transcendental understanding of life is explored here as a basis for alternative explanations to some biological mysteries, in particular, a collection of intelligence-related phenomena, and more generally, the missing heritability problem (“transcendental” will be used herein in place of a number of existing terms including “transmigration” and “reincarnation”). An extended introduction considers possible carryover from previous lives as a complementary component of life and, specifically, as an additional vehicle for apparent heredity. This introduction also touches on two relevant examples - the innate spiritual or religious understandings of young children and the mysteries associated with monozygotic twins. The subsequent discussion section then considers a constellation of three intelligence-related mysteries - a childhood behavioral syndrome, the Einstein Syndrome; the somewhat overlapping phenomena of savants and prodigies; and then the observed rise in IQ’s or the Flynn Effect - which together with the inability to identify a significant DNA basis for the variations in intelligence, represent a significant challenge to the modern understanding of humans. Alternative explanations from the transcendental perspective are considered along the way.



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Ted Christopher, Ph.D.

Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound, University of Rochester

For correspondence:
tchrist7@rochester.rr.com

Ted Christopher, Ph.D.

Rochester Center for Biomedical Ultrasound, University of Rochester

For correspondence:
tchrist7@rochester.rr.com