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Original article
peer-reviewed

Epidemiology and Characteristics of Cervical Spine Injury in Patients Presenting to a Regional Emergency Department



Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to establish the demographics and characteristics of patients with cervical spine injury (CSI) in an Irish cohort presenting to a regional emergency department.

Methods

We performed a retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients who underwent cervical spine computed tomography (CT) scans following trauma from January 2013 to July 2016. We looked at the mechanism of injury, mode of arrival to the emergency department, triage category, correlation between examination, and site of CSI and neurological status.

Results

Over the study period, 808 patients underwent CT scans of the cervical spine for potential CSI. The incidence of CSI in our cohort was 9.4% (n = 76). Approximately 70% (n = 53) were men. Falls (53%) and motor vehicle accidents (29%) were noted to be the more common mechanisms of injury in this cohort. The C2 region was the most common location for CSI. Only 7% (n = 5) of patients had documented neurology.

Conclusion

This study demonstrates the epidemiology and characteristics of CSI presenting in an Irish cohort. The incidence of CSI was found to be 9.4% with a male preponderance and falls being the most common cause of trauma.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Epidemiology and Characteristics of Cervical Spine Injury in Patients Presenting to a Regional Emergency Department


Author Information

Etimbuk Umana Corresponding Author

Department of Emergency Medicine, University Hospital Galway

Khalid Khan

Department of Emergency Medicine, University Hospital Galway

MN Baig

Trauma & Orthopaedics, Galway University Hospital

James Binchy

Department of Emergency Medicine, University Hospital Galway


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Epidemiology and Characteristics of Cervical Spine Injury in Patients Presenting to a Regional Emergency Department


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Epidemiology and Characteristics of Cervical Spine Injury in Patients Presenting to a Regional Emergency Department

  • Author Information
    Etimbuk Umana Corresponding Author

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University Hospital Galway

    Khalid Khan

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University Hospital Galway

    MN Baig

    Trauma & Orthopaedics, Galway University Hospital

    James Binchy

    Department of Emergency Medicine, University Hospital Galway


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: February 10, 2018

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.2179

    Cite this article as:

    Umana E, Khan K, Baig M, et al. (February 10, 2018) Epidemiology and Characteristics of Cervical Spine Injury in Patients Presenting to a Regional Emergency Department. Cureus 10(2): e2179. doi:10.7759/cureus.2179

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: January 22, 2018
    Peer review began: January 29, 2018
    Peer review concluded: February 06, 2018
    Published: February 10, 2018

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2018
    Umana et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to establish the demographics and characteristics of patients with cervical spine injury (CSI) in an Irish cohort presenting to a regional emergency department.

Methods

We performed a retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients who underwent cervical spine computed tomography (CT) scans following trauma from January 2013 to July 2016. We looked at the mechanism of injury, mode of arrival to the emergency department, triage category, correlation between examination, and site of CSI and neurological status.

Results

Over the study period, 808 patients underwent CT scans of the cervical spine for potential CSI. The incidence of CSI in our cohort was 9.4% (n = 76). Approximately 70% (n = 53) were men. Falls (53%) and motor vehicle accidents (29%) were noted to be the more common mechanisms of injury in this cohort. The C2 region was the most common location for CSI. Only 7% (n = 5) of patients had documented neurology.

Conclusion

This study demonstrates the epidemiology and characteristics of CSI presenting in an Irish cohort. The incidence of CSI was found to be 9.4% with a male preponderance and falls being the most common cause of trauma.



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