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Review article
peer-reviewed

Neuroanatomy of Anxiety: A Brief Review



Abstract

Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychological issues worldwide, displaying the youngest age of onset and greatest chronicity of any mood or substance abuse disorder. Given the high social and economic cost imposed by these disorders, developing effective treatments is of the utmost importance. Anxiety disorders manifest in a variety of symptomatic phenotypes and are highly comorbid with other psychological diseases such as depression. These facts have made unraveling the complex underlying neural circuity an ever-present challenge for researchers. We offer a brief review on the neuroanatomy of anxiety disorders and discuss several currently available therapeutic options.



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Review article
peer-reviewed

Neuroanatomy of Anxiety: A Brief Review


Author Information

Cameron K. Schmidt Corresponding Author

Clinical Anatomy, Seattle Science Foundation

Shehzad Khalid

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

Marios Loukas

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

R. Shane Tubbs

Neurosurgery, Seattle Science Foundation


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


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Review article
peer-reviewed

Neuroanatomy of Anxiety: A Brief Review

  • Author Information
    Cameron K. Schmidt Corresponding Author

    Clinical Anatomy, Seattle Science Foundation

    Shehzad Khalid

    Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

    Marios Loukas

    Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

    R. Shane Tubbs

    Neurosurgery, Seattle Science Foundation


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: January 12, 2018

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.2055

    Cite this article as:

    Schmidt C K, Khalid S, Loukas M, et al. (January 12, 2018) Neuroanatomy of Anxiety: A Brief Review. Cureus 10(1): e2055. doi:10.7759/cureus.2055

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: December 12, 2017
    Peer review began: January 04, 2018
    Peer review concluded: January 08, 2018
    Published: January 12, 2018

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2018
    Schmidt et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychological issues worldwide, displaying the youngest age of onset and greatest chronicity of any mood or substance abuse disorder. Given the high social and economic cost imposed by these disorders, developing effective treatments is of the utmost importance. Anxiety disorders manifest in a variety of symptomatic phenotypes and are highly comorbid with other psychological diseases such as depression. These facts have made unraveling the complex underlying neural circuity an ever-present challenge for researchers. We offer a brief review on the neuroanatomy of anxiety disorders and discuss several currently available therapeutic options.



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

Already a member? Login.



Cameron K. Schmidt

Clinical Anatomy, Seattle Science Foundation

For correspondence:
cameronkurtschmidt@gmail.com

Shehzad Khalid, M.D.

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

Marios Loukas

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

R. Shane Tubbs, Ph.D., Professor

Neurosurgery, Seattle Science Foundation

Cameron K. Schmidt

Clinical Anatomy, Seattle Science Foundation

For correspondence:
cameronkurtschmidt@gmail.com

Shehzad Khalid, M.D.

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

Marios Loukas

Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George's University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies

R. Shane Tubbs, Ph.D., Professor

Neurosurgery, Seattle Science Foundation