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Case report
peer-reviewed

Self-inflicted Cardiac Injury with Nail Gun Without Hemodynamic Compromise: A Case Report



Abstract

Pneumatically powered nail guns have been used in construction since 1959. Penetrating injuries to the heart with nail guns have a wide range of presentations from asymptomatic to cardiac tamponade and exsanguination. Mortality related to cardiac nail gun injuries is similar to knife injuries, estimated at 25%. Surgical exploration is the treatment of choice. We describe a case of self-inflicted nail gun injury to the chest without hemodynamic compromise in a 51-year-old man. Computed tomography (CT) imaging confirmed nail penetrating the right ventricle, with the tip adjacent to but not violating the abdominal aorta. The patient was successfully treated with thoracotomy and foreign body removal.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Self-inflicted Cardiac Injury with Nail Gun Without Hemodynamic Compromise: A Case Report


Author Information

Simon Ho

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Bo Liu Corresponding Author

Diagnostic Radiology, Florida Hospital-Orlando

Nicholas Feranec

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Florida Hospital-Orlando


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Florida Hospital issued approval N/A. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Self-inflicted Cardiac Injury with Nail Gun Without Hemodynamic Compromise: A Case Report


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Self-inflicted Cardiac Injury with Nail Gun Without Hemodynamic Compromise: A Case Report

  • Author Information
    Simon Ho

    College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

    Bo Liu Corresponding Author

    Diagnostic Radiology, Florida Hospital-Orlando

    Nicholas Feranec

    College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

    Florida Hospital-Orlando


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Florida Hospital issued approval N/A. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: January 10, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.971

    Cite this article as:

    Ho S, Liu B, Feranec N (January 10, 2017) Self-inflicted Cardiac Injury with Nail Gun Without Hemodynamic Compromise: A Case Report. Cureus 9(1): e971. doi:10.7759/cureus.971

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: October 07, 2016
    Peer review began: December 07, 2016
    Peer review concluded: January 03, 2017
    Published: January 10, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Ho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Pneumatically powered nail guns have been used in construction since 1959. Penetrating injuries to the heart with nail guns have a wide range of presentations from asymptomatic to cardiac tamponade and exsanguination. Mortality related to cardiac nail gun injuries is similar to knife injuries, estimated at 25%. Surgical exploration is the treatment of choice. We describe a case of self-inflicted nail gun injury to the chest without hemodynamic compromise in a 51-year-old man. Computed tomography (CT) imaging confirmed nail penetrating the right ventricle, with the tip adjacent to but not violating the abdominal aorta. The patient was successfully treated with thoracotomy and foreign body removal.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Simon Ho

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Bo Liu

Diagnostic Radiology, Florida Hospital-Orlando

For correspondence:
bo.liu.md@flhosp.org

Nicholas Feranec

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Simon Ho

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida

Bo Liu

Diagnostic Radiology, Florida Hospital-Orlando

For correspondence:
bo.liu.md@flhosp.org

Nicholas Feranec

College of Medicine, University of Central Florida