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Original article
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Utilizing the VeraFlo™ Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System with Advanced Care for a Case Study



Abstract

Background: Mankind has always suffered wounds throughout time due to trauma, disease, and lifestyles. Many wounds are non-healing and have continued to be challenging. However, utilizing advanced wound care treatments, such as negative pressure wound treatment with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d), has proven beneficial.

NPWTi-d is indicated in a variety of wounds, such as trauma, surgical, acute, pressure injuries, diabetic foot ulcers, and venous leg ulcers. Bacteria and bioburden interrupts wound healing by increasing the metabolic needs, ingesting, and robbing the necessary nutrients and oxygen.

Instillation therapy is the technique of intermittently washing out a wound with a liquid solution. The mechanism of action is instilling fluid into the wound bed, soaking for a determined time, loosening and cleaning of exudate, contaminants, and/or infection, removing fluid via negative pressure, thus promoting tissue growth.

Case study: The patient was diagnosed with a large lymphedema mass on the right upper thigh. Surgical removal of the lymphedema mass was indicated due to interference with quality of life. After a failed flap and surgical debridement, NPWTi-d with normal saline was implemented.

Results: The patient had excellent results, with obvious forming of red, beefy granulation, epithelization tissue development, and a cleaner, healthier wound bed. Settings for the NPWTi-d was 18 minutes dwell time, every 2.5 hours with a constant pressure of 125 mm/hg pressure.

Conclusion: The NPWTi-d demonstrated to be an instrumental treatment in supporting and stimulating healing. Early application of the treatment with normal saline as the instillation fluid prepared the previously failed wound for quicker healing.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Utilizing the VeraFlo™ Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System with Advanced Care for a Case Study


Author Information

Rita K. Driver Corresponding Author

Advanced Wound Healing Center, Jackson Purchase Medical Center


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

Acknowledgements

Healogics, Jackson Purchase Medical Center-Advanced Wound Healing Center, and Roy Galen (Acelity, Inc).


Original article
peer-reviewed

Utilizing the VeraFlo™ Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System with Advanced Care for a Case Study


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Original article
peer-reviewed
3 Place Winner

Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation

Utilizing the VeraFlo™ Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System with Advanced Care for a Case Study

  • Author Information
    Rita K. Driver Corresponding Author

    Advanced Wound Healing Center, Jackson Purchase Medical Center


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements

    Healogics, Jackson Purchase Medical Center-Advanced Wound Healing Center, and Roy Galen (Acelity, Inc).


    Article Information

    Published: November 30, 2016

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.903

    Cite this article as:

    Driver R K (November 30, 2016) Utilizing the VeraFlo™ Instillation Negative Pressure Wound Therapy System with Advanced Care for a Case Study . Cureus 8(11): e903. doi:10.7759/cureus.903

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: September 01, 2016
    Peer review began: September 26, 2016
    Peer review concluded: November 28, 2016
    Published: November 30, 2016

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2016
    Driver. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background: Mankind has always suffered wounds throughout time due to trauma, disease, and lifestyles. Many wounds are non-healing and have continued to be challenging. However, utilizing advanced wound care treatments, such as negative pressure wound treatment with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d), has proven beneficial.

NPWTi-d is indicated in a variety of wounds, such as trauma, surgical, acute, pressure injuries, diabetic foot ulcers, and venous leg ulcers. Bacteria and bioburden interrupts wound healing by increasing the metabolic needs, ingesting, and robbing the necessary nutrients and oxygen.

Instillation therapy is the technique of intermittently washing out a wound with a liquid solution. The mechanism of action is instilling fluid into the wound bed, soaking for a determined time, loosening and cleaning of exudate, contaminants, and/or infection, removing fluid via negative pressure, thus promoting tissue growth.

Case study: The patient was diagnosed with a large lymphedema mass on the right upper thigh. Surgical removal of the lymphedema mass was indicated due to interference with quality of life. After a failed flap and surgical debridement, NPWTi-d with normal saline was implemented.

Results: The patient had excellent results, with obvious forming of red, beefy granulation, epithelization tissue development, and a cleaner, healthier wound bed. Settings for the NPWTi-d was 18 minutes dwell time, every 2.5 hours with a constant pressure of 125 mm/hg pressure.

Conclusion: The NPWTi-d demonstrated to be an instrumental treatment in supporting and stimulating healing. Early application of the treatment with normal saline as the instillation fluid prepared the previously failed wound for quicker healing.



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Rita K. Driver

Advanced Wound Healing Center, Jackson Purchase Medical Center

For correspondence:
rita.driver@lpnt.net

Rita K. Driver

Advanced Wound Healing Center, Jackson Purchase Medical Center

For correspondence:
rita.driver@lpnt.net