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Case report
peer-reviewed

Inverted Meckel’s Diverticulum: Rare Etiology of an Intestinal Obstruction



Abstract

Acute gastrointestinal obstruction can have a varied spectrum of clinical presentation and etiologies. It has been studied in detail and the management criteria have been well defined for the most part in our era. The etiologies are usually well defined. However, acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) due to intussusception caused by an inverted Meckel's diverticulum is a rare phenomenon that is often times missed on initial presentation and/or consequently until resected and visualized on pathological examination. We present a case of a 34-year-old presenting with symptoms and signs of acute intestinal obstruction and radiographic exam showing ileo-ileal intussusception. The patient failed to improve initially following conservative management and was taken to the operating room for small bowel resection which then revealed an inverted Meckel’s diverticulum.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Inverted Meckel’s Diverticulum: Rare Etiology of an Intestinal Obstruction


Author Information

Vishnu R. Mani Corresponding Author

Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, and the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, Columbia University School of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Department of Surgery, Columbia University School of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Aleksandr Kalabin

General Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Anant Dinesh

General Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Ajai Rajabalan

Department of Medicine, North Side Medical Center

Marina Landa

Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Albert Adu

Department of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Inverted Meckel’s Diverticulum: Rare Etiology of an Intestinal Obstruction


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Inverted Meckel’s Diverticulum: Rare Etiology of an Intestinal Obstruction

Vishnu R. Mani">Vishnu R. Mani , Aleksandr Kalabin">Aleksandr Kalabin, Anant Dinesh">Anant Dinesh, Ajai Rajabalan">Ajai Rajabalan, Marina Landa">Marina Landa, Albert Adu">Albert Adu

  • Author Information
    Vishnu R. Mani Corresponding Author

    Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, and the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, Columbia University School of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

    Department of Surgery, Columbia University School of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

    Aleksandr Kalabin

    General Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

    Anant Dinesh

    General Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

    Ajai Rajabalan

    Department of Medicine, North Side Medical Center

    Marina Landa

    Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

    Albert Adu

    Department of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: October 27, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1806

    Cite this article as:

    Mani V R, Kalabin A, Dinesh A, et al. (October 27, 2017) Inverted Meckel’s Diverticulum: Rare Etiology of an Intestinal Obstruction . Cureus 9(10): e1806. doi:10.7759/cureus.1806

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: October 04, 2017
    Peer review began: October 09, 2017
    Peer review concluded: October 24, 2017
    Published: October 27, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Mani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Acute gastrointestinal obstruction can have a varied spectrum of clinical presentation and etiologies. It has been studied in detail and the management criteria have been well defined for the most part in our era. The etiologies are usually well defined. However, acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) due to intussusception caused by an inverted Meckel's diverticulum is a rare phenomenon that is often times missed on initial presentation and/or consequently until resected and visualized on pathological examination. We present a case of a 34-year-old presenting with symptoms and signs of acute intestinal obstruction and radiographic exam showing ileo-ileal intussusception. The patient failed to improve initially following conservative management and was taken to the operating room for small bowel resection which then revealed an inverted Meckel’s diverticulum.



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Vishnu R. Mani, M.D.

Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, and the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, Columbia University School of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

For correspondence:
mani.montfort@gmail.com

Aleksandr Kalabin

General Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Anant Dinesh, M.D.

General Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Ajai Rajabalan

Department of Medicine, North Side Medical Center

Marina Landa, M.D.

Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Albert Adu

Department of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Vishnu R. Mani, M.D.

Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, and the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, Columbia University School of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

For correspondence:
mani.montfort@gmail.com

Aleksandr Kalabin

General Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Anant Dinesh, M.D.

General Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Ajai Rajabalan

Department of Medicine, North Side Medical Center

Marina Landa, M.D.

Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center

Albert Adu

Department of Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons at Harlem Hospital Center