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Case report
peer-reviewed

Two Cases of Myiasis Associated with Malignancies in Patients Living in the Continental United States



Abstract

Myiasis is the infestation of humans with dipterous larvae. Traditionally, myiasis was thought to affect individuals living in tropical regions, however, several cases in temperate zones have been reported. We encountered two patients with histories of malignancies that presented with complaints of myiasis, in Chicago, in the spring and summer of 2016. The first patient, a 54-year-old female with a history of breast cancer, presented with complaints of maggots infesting her postsurgical chest wounds. She was diagnosed with sepsis, cellulitis, and wound myiasis. The second patient, a 63-year-old female with a history of recurrent ovarian cancer, presented with complaints of passing maggots vaginally and seeing worms mixed with her stools. She was diagnosed with internal urogenital myiasis. The first lesson that we learned from these cases is that myiasis can occur in individuals living in any part of the world. Second of all, for patients with accidental myiasis, a sample of the larvae should be sent for analysis to help guide the treatment. Third of all, myiasis has been associated with new or recurrent malignancies, and therefore a biopsy of the affected tissue should be sent for analysis. Finally, we learned that myiasis can serve as a form of tissue debridement; this coinciding benefit should not prevent the treatment of accidental myiasis.



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Case report
peer-reviewed

Two Cases of Myiasis Associated with Malignancies in Patients Living in the Continental United States


Author Information

Anita Lwanga Corresponding Author

Department of Academic Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, University of Illinois at Chicago

Department of Geriatrics, Jesse Brown Va Medical Center

Michael Anis

Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital

Mohamed Ayoubi

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital

Jaya Sharma

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai

Pam Khosla

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. issued approval N/A. "Written consent to write the case reports and display images was obtained from both patients.”. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


Case report
peer-reviewed

Two Cases of Myiasis Associated with Malignancies in Patients Living in the Continental United States


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Case report
peer-reviewed

Two Cases of Myiasis Associated with Malignancies in Patients Living in the Continental United States

  • Author Information
    Anita Lwanga Corresponding Author

    Department of Academic Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, University of Illinois at Chicago

    Department of Geriatrics, Jesse Brown Va Medical Center

    Michael Anis

    Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital

    Mohamed Ayoubi

    Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital

    Jaya Sharma

    Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai

    Pam Khosla

    Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. issued approval N/A. "Written consent to write the case reports and display images was obtained from both patients.”. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: January 10, 2018

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.2049

    Cite this article as:

    Lwanga A, Anis M, Ayoubi M, et al. (January 10, 2018) Two Cases of Myiasis Associated with Malignancies in Patients Living in the Continental United States. Cureus 10(1): e2049. doi:10.7759/cureus.2049

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: September 12, 2017
    Peer review began: September 14, 2017
    Peer review concluded: January 04, 2018
    Published: January 10, 2018

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2018
    Lwanga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Myiasis is the infestation of humans with dipterous larvae. Traditionally, myiasis was thought to affect individuals living in tropical regions, however, several cases in temperate zones have been reported. We encountered two patients with histories of malignancies that presented with complaints of myiasis, in Chicago, in the spring and summer of 2016. The first patient, a 54-year-old female with a history of breast cancer, presented with complaints of maggots infesting her postsurgical chest wounds. She was diagnosed with sepsis, cellulitis, and wound myiasis. The second patient, a 63-year-old female with a history of recurrent ovarian cancer, presented with complaints of passing maggots vaginally and seeing worms mixed with her stools. She was diagnosed with internal urogenital myiasis. The first lesson that we learned from these cases is that myiasis can occur in individuals living in any part of the world. Second of all, for patients with accidental myiasis, a sample of the larvae should be sent for analysis to help guide the treatment. Third of all, myiasis has been associated with new or recurrent malignancies, and therefore a biopsy of the affected tissue should be sent for analysis. Finally, we learned that myiasis can serve as a form of tissue debridement; this coinciding benefit should not prevent the treatment of accidental myiasis.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Anita Lwanga, M.D., Fellow Physician

Department of Academic Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, University of Illinois at Chicago

For correspondence:
alwang6@uic.edu

Michael Anis, M.D.

Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital

Mohamed Ayoubi

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital

Jaya Sharma

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai

Pam Khosla

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital

Anita Lwanga, M.D., Fellow Physician

Department of Academic Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, University of Illinois at Chicago

For correspondence:
alwang6@uic.edu

Michael Anis, M.D.

Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Hospital

Mohamed Ayoubi

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital

Jaya Sharma

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai

Pam Khosla

Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital