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Original article
peer-reviewed

An Overview of Infant Mortality Trends in Qatar from 2004 to 2014



Abstract

Background

Infant mortality is an important health indicator that estimates population well-being. Infant mortality has declined globally but is still a major public health challenge. This article provides the characteristics, causes, burden, and trends of infant mortality in Qatar.

Methods

Frequencies, percentages, and rates were calculated using data from birth-death registries over 2004–2014 to describe infant mortality by nationality, gender, and age group. We calculated the relative risks of the top causes of infant mortality among subgroups according to the 10th Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10, Version 2016).

Results

During 2004–2014, 204,224 live births and 1,505 infant deaths were recorded. The infant mortality rate (IMR) averaged 7.4/1000 live births (males 8.1, females 6.6, non-Qataris 7.7, and Qataris 6.8). IMR declined 20% from 2004 to 2014. The decline in IMR was significant for the overall population of infants (p=0.006), male infants (p=0.04), females (p=0.006), and for non-Qatari males (p=0.007) and non-Qatari females (p=0.007). The leading causes of infant mortality were congenital malformations (all types) (34.5%), low birth weight (LBW) (27%), and respiratory distress of newborns (2.8%). Male infants had a higher risk of mortality than female infants due to a congenital malformation of lungs (p=0.02), other congenital malformations, not elsewhere classified (p=0.01), and cardiovascular disorders (p=0.05).

Conclusion

The study shows that infant mortality among male infants is high due to the top infant mortality-related disorders, and male infants have a higher risk of mortality than female infants.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

An Overview of Infant Mortality Trends in Qatar from 2004 to 2014


Author Information

Mohammed Al-Thani

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Al-Anoud Al-Thani

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Amine Toumi

Health Intelligence and Information Section, Ministry of Public Health

Shams Eldin Khalifa

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Hammad Akram Corresponding Author

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Original article
peer-reviewed

An Overview of Infant Mortality Trends in Qatar from 2004 to 2014


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Original article
peer-reviewed

An Overview of Infant Mortality Trends in Qatar from 2004 to 2014

  • Author Information
    Mohammed Al-Thani

    Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

    Al-Anoud Al-Thani

    Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

    Amine Toumi

    Health Intelligence and Information Section, Ministry of Public Health

    Shams Eldin Khalifa

    Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

    Hammad Akram Corresponding Author

    Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 09, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1669

    Cite this article as:

    Al-thani M, Al-thani A, Toumi A, et al. (September 09, 2017) An Overview of Infant Mortality Trends in Qatar from 2004 to 2014. Cureus 9(9): e1669. doi:10.7759/cureus.1669

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: July 24, 2017
    Peer review began: August 01, 2017
    Peer review concluded: September 08, 2017
    Published: September 09, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Al-Thani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background

Infant mortality is an important health indicator that estimates population well-being. Infant mortality has declined globally but is still a major public health challenge. This article provides the characteristics, causes, burden, and trends of infant mortality in Qatar.

Methods

Frequencies, percentages, and rates were calculated using data from birth-death registries over 2004–2014 to describe infant mortality by nationality, gender, and age group. We calculated the relative risks of the top causes of infant mortality among subgroups according to the 10th Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10, Version 2016).

Results

During 2004–2014, 204,224 live births and 1,505 infant deaths were recorded. The infant mortality rate (IMR) averaged 7.4/1000 live births (males 8.1, females 6.6, non-Qataris 7.7, and Qataris 6.8). IMR declined 20% from 2004 to 2014. The decline in IMR was significant for the overall population of infants (p=0.006), male infants (p=0.04), females (p=0.006), and for non-Qatari males (p=0.007) and non-Qatari females (p=0.007). The leading causes of infant mortality were congenital malformations (all types) (34.5%), low birth weight (LBW) (27%), and respiratory distress of newborns (2.8%). Male infants had a higher risk of mortality than female infants due to a congenital malformation of lungs (p=0.02), other congenital malformations, not elsewhere classified (p=0.01), and cardiovascular disorders (p=0.05).

Conclusion

The study shows that infant mortality among male infants is high due to the top infant mortality-related disorders, and male infants have a higher risk of mortality than female infants.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Mohammed Al-Thani

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Al-Anoud Al-Thani

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Amine Toumi

Health Intelligence and Information Section, Ministry of Public Health

Shams Eldin Khalifa, M.Sc.

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Hammad Akram, M.D., M.P.H., FRSPH

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

For correspondence:
hammadakram77@yahoo.com

Mohammed Al-Thani

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Al-Anoud Al-Thani

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Amine Toumi

Health Intelligence and Information Section, Ministry of Public Health

Shams Eldin Khalifa, M.Sc.

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

Hammad Akram, M.D., M.P.H., FRSPH

Ministry of Public Health, State of Qatar

For correspondence:
hammadakram77@yahoo.com