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peer-reviewed
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Clinical and Economic Benefits of Autologous Epidermal Grafting



Abstract

Chronic wounds are an increasingly prevalent disease with a significant healthcare burden. These wounds often do not respond to standard of care therapy alone, requiring the use of adjuvant therapies. Epidermal grafting, previously utilized primarily for correction of leukoderma, is increasingly being recognized as a beneficial therapy for wounds, both acute and chronic. Epidermal grafting has been shown to be effective in the management of chronic wounds, with successful healing in refractory patients. It has not only been shown to be effective, but it is also associated with lower cost and morbidity than traditional skin grafting techniques as well as improved donor site healing. Through the use of a novel epidermal harvesting system, the CelluTome™ Epidermal Harvesting System (KCI, an Acelity company, San Antonio, TX), this treatment modality has become more standardized, reproducible, and easy to use as well as less time consuming, making its use in the clinical setting more convenient and beneficial. Epidermal grafting, therefore, represents a promising, efficacious, and cost-effective option for treatment of refractory non-healing wounds.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Clinical and Economic Benefits of Autologous Epidermal Grafting


Author Information

Andrea D. Maderal Corresponding Author

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine

Robert S. Kirsner

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared the following conflicts of interest: Financial relationships: Robert Kirsner declare(s) Consultant from Acelity. Consultant.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Clinical and Economic Benefits of Autologous Epidermal Grafting


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Original article
peer-reviewed
1 Place Winner

Clinical and Economic Benefits of Autologous Epidermal Grafting

Clinical and Economic Benefits of Autologous Epidermal Grafting

  • Author Information
    Andrea D. Maderal Corresponding Author

    Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine

    Robert S. Kirsner

    Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared the following conflicts of interest: Financial relationships: Robert Kirsner declare(s) Consultant from Acelity. Consultant.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: November 11, 2016

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.875

    Cite this article as:

    Maderal A D, Kirsner R S (November 11, 2016) Clinical and Economic Benefits of Autologous Epidermal Grafting. Cureus 8(11): e875. doi:10.7759/cureus.875

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: September 26, 2016
    Peer review began: September 27, 2016
    Peer review concluded: November 07, 2016
    Published: November 11, 2016

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2016
    Maderal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Chronic wounds are an increasingly prevalent disease with a significant healthcare burden. These wounds often do not respond to standard of care therapy alone, requiring the use of adjuvant therapies. Epidermal grafting, previously utilized primarily for correction of leukoderma, is increasingly being recognized as a beneficial therapy for wounds, both acute and chronic. Epidermal grafting has been shown to be effective in the management of chronic wounds, with successful healing in refractory patients. It has not only been shown to be effective, but it is also associated with lower cost and morbidity than traditional skin grafting techniques as well as improved donor site healing. Through the use of a novel epidermal harvesting system, the CelluTome™ Epidermal Harvesting System (KCI, an Acelity company, San Antonio, TX), this treatment modality has become more standardized, reproducible, and easy to use as well as less time consuming, making its use in the clinical setting more convenient and beneficial. Epidermal grafting, therefore, represents a promising, efficacious, and cost-effective option for treatment of refractory non-healing wounds.



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Andrea D. Maderal

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine

For correspondence:
amaderal@med.miami.edu

Robert S. Kirsner, M.D.

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine

Andrea D. Maderal

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine

For correspondence:
amaderal@med.miami.edu

Robert S. Kirsner, M.D.

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine