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Original article
peer-reviewed

What Can We Learn About Debriefing From Other High-Risk/High-Stakes Industries?



Abstract

Objectives: To explore the debriefing methodologies utilised in high-risk/high-stakes industries with the intention of informing healthcare practice.

Methods: A sequential mixed methods approach was adopted to explore the use of feedback/debriefing methodologies in ten different industries. A first phase standardised survey focused on timing of debriefing post-event, debriefing techniques used, duration of debrief provision, technology used, and follow-up provision. A second phase observational study at one site (aerobatic team) explored debriefing in detail with a standardised tool and semi-structured interview technique.

Results: This study highlighted variability in debriefing practices, style, and duration amongst ten high-risk/high-stakes industries. The second phase observation study identified a highly effective method of self-directed video-based auto-debriefing.

Conclusions: Debriefing after critical or routine events is common practice in a range of high-risk/high-stakes industries. A key theme was the recognition of the importance of debriefing to promote reflection to increase performance and mitigate risk. Further in-depth qualitative analysis of the adoption of these debriefing techniques into healthcare and simulated practice is warranted.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

What Can We Learn About Debriefing From Other High-Risk/High-Stakes Industries?


Author Information

Ralph MacKinnon Corresponding Author

Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia & North West and North Wales Paediatric Transport Service, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, UK

Suzanne Gough

Health Professions Department, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Original article
peer-reviewed

What Can We Learn About Debriefing From Other High-Risk/High-Stakes Industries?


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Original article
peer-reviewed

What Can We Learn About Debriefing From Other High-Risk/High-Stakes Industries?

  • Author Information
    Ralph MacKinnon Corresponding Author

    Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia & North West and North Wales Paediatric Transport Service, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, UK

    Suzanne Gough

    Health Professions Department, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: April 25, 2014

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.174

    Cite this article as:

    Mackinnon R, Gough S (April 25, 2014) What Can We Learn About Debriefing From Other High-Risk/High-Stakes Industries?. Cureus 6(4): e174. doi:10.7759/cureus.174

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: April 18, 2014
    Peer review began: April 18, 2014
    Peer review concluded: April 24, 2014
    Published: April 25, 2014

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2014
    MacKinnon et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Objectives: To explore the debriefing methodologies utilised in high-risk/high-stakes industries with the intention of informing healthcare practice.

Methods: A sequential mixed methods approach was adopted to explore the use of feedback/debriefing methodologies in ten different industries. A first phase standardised survey focused on timing of debriefing post-event, debriefing techniques used, duration of debrief provision, technology used, and follow-up provision. A second phase observational study at one site (aerobatic team) explored debriefing in detail with a standardised tool and semi-structured interview technique.

Results: This study highlighted variability in debriefing practices, style, and duration amongst ten high-risk/high-stakes industries. The second phase observation study identified a highly effective method of self-directed video-based auto-debriefing.

Conclusions: Debriefing after critical or routine events is common practice in a range of high-risk/high-stakes industries. A key theme was the recognition of the importance of debriefing to promote reflection to increase performance and mitigate risk. Further in-depth qualitative analysis of the adoption of these debriefing techniques into healthcare and simulated practice is warranted.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Ralph MacKinnon

Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia & North West and North Wales Paediatric Transport Service, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, UK

For correspondence:
ralph.mackinnon@cmft.nhs.uk

Suzanne Gough

Health Professions Department, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK

Ralph MacKinnon

Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia & North West and North Wales Paediatric Transport Service, Royal Manchester Children's Hospital, UK

For correspondence:
ralph.mackinnon@cmft.nhs.uk

Suzanne Gough

Health Professions Department, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK