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Original article
peer-reviewed

Euthanasia: A Controversial Entity Among Students of Karachi



Abstract

Background

A serene death may be achieved through skilled and compassionate care, as well as by the dying person's own sense of having lived a righteous life. The purpose of this study is to acquire information about students’ knowledge and understanding of euthanasia.

Materials and Methods

Four hundred and fifty-six students from four classes of two institutions with similar demographic characteristics were included in this cross-sectional study. A questionnaire adapted from a study of ‘Gruber, et al.’ was distributed among the respondents after obtaining a verbal informed consent. The questionnaire had two parts, first dealing with demographics of respondents, and in the second part students were given different situations and asked about their decision in that particular setting to understand their opinion about euthanasia.

Results

There were 31.7% medical students and 12.9% non-medical students in favor to provide complete medical information (p < 0.001) while 59.2% non-medical students thought that complete information should be given to a patient if any iatrogenic incident occurred. Same favored by 33.7% of medical students (p < 0.001). The majority of medical students (84.5%) felt that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) must always be provided (p < 0.001) and this was acceptable more among females (p = 0.001). Furthermore, medical students (57.6%) were more in favor of continuing maximum medical treatment including CPR than non-medical students (42.9%, p = 0.003). A total of 83% non-medical students and 46% medical students found euthanasia an acceptable practice.

Conclusion

Results show a significant difference in perception of medical and non-medical students regarding euthanasia. Non-medical students are more in favor of euthanasia than medical students. Also, it is observed that males seem to be more inclined towards euthanasia while females are more in favor to provide maximum medical treatment.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Euthanasia: A Controversial Entity Among Students of Karachi


Author Information

Ameet Kumar

Department of Medicine, Macneal Hospital

Syeda Naqvi Corresponding Author

Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Jinnah Sindh Medical University (SMC)

Pirthvi Raj Giyanwani

Civil Hospital Karachi, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, Pakistan

Fareeha Yousuf

Civil Hospital Karachi, DOW Medical College

Aaliya Masnoon

Internal Medicine, Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga, Ontario

Kiran Bai

Medicine, Peoples University of Medical and health sciences for women

Deepak Kumar

Internal Medicine, Civil Hospital Sukkur


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Informed consent obtained. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Euthanasia: A Controversial Entity Among Students of Karachi


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Euthanasia: A Controversial Entity Among Students of Karachi

  • Author Information
    Ameet Kumar

    Department of Medicine, Macneal Hospital

    Syeda Naqvi Corresponding Author

    Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Jinnah Sindh Medical University (SMC)

    Pirthvi Raj Giyanwani

    Civil Hospital Karachi, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, Pakistan

    Fareeha Yousuf

    Civil Hospital Karachi, DOW Medical College

    Aaliya Masnoon

    Internal Medicine, Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga, Ontario

    Kiran Bai

    Medicine, Peoples University of Medical and health sciences for women

    Deepak Kumar

    Internal Medicine, Civil Hospital Sukkur


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Informed consent obtained. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: July 24, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1510

    Cite this article as:

    Kumar A, Naqvi S, Giyanwani P, et al. (July 24, 2017) Euthanasia: A Controversial Entity Among Students of Karachi. Cureus 9(7): e1510. doi:10.7759/cureus.1510

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: June 21, 2017
    Peer review began: July 05, 2017
    Peer review concluded: July 16, 2017
    Published: July 24, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Kumar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Background

A serene death may be achieved through skilled and compassionate care, as well as by the dying person's own sense of having lived a righteous life. The purpose of this study is to acquire information about students’ knowledge and understanding of euthanasia.

Materials and Methods

Four hundred and fifty-six students from four classes of two institutions with similar demographic characteristics were included in this cross-sectional study. A questionnaire adapted from a study of ‘Gruber, et al.’ was distributed among the respondents after obtaining a verbal informed consent. The questionnaire had two parts, first dealing with demographics of respondents, and in the second part students were given different situations and asked about their decision in that particular setting to understand their opinion about euthanasia.

Results

There were 31.7% medical students and 12.9% non-medical students in favor to provide complete medical information (p < 0.001) while 59.2% non-medical students thought that complete information should be given to a patient if any iatrogenic incident occurred. Same favored by 33.7% of medical students (p < 0.001). The majority of medical students (84.5%) felt that cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) must always be provided (p < 0.001) and this was acceptable more among females (p = 0.001). Furthermore, medical students (57.6%) were more in favor of continuing maximum medical treatment including CPR than non-medical students (42.9%, p = 0.003). A total of 83% non-medical students and 46% medical students found euthanasia an acceptable practice.

Conclusion

Results show a significant difference in perception of medical and non-medical students regarding euthanasia. Non-medical students are more in favor of euthanasia than medical students. Also, it is observed that males seem to be more inclined towards euthanasia while females are more in favor to provide maximum medical treatment.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Ameet Kumar

Department of Medicine, Macneal Hospital

Syeda Naqvi, M.D.

Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Jinnah Sindh Medical University (SMC)

For correspondence:
syedafati240@gmail.com

Pirthvi Raj Giyanwani, M.D.

Civil Hospital Karachi, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, Pakistan

Fareeha Yousuf, Resident Physician

Civil Hospital Karachi, DOW Medical College

Aaliya Masnoon

Internal Medicine, Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga, Ontario

Kiran Bai

Medicine, Peoples University of Medical and health sciences for women

Deepak Kumar

Internal Medicine, Civil Hospital Sukkur

Ameet Kumar

Department of Medicine, Macneal Hospital

Syeda Naqvi, M.D.

Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Jinnah Sindh Medical University (SMC)

For correspondence:
syedafati240@gmail.com

Pirthvi Raj Giyanwani, M.D.

Civil Hospital Karachi, Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS), Karachi, Pakistan

Fareeha Yousuf, Resident Physician

Civil Hospital Karachi, DOW Medical College

Aaliya Masnoon

Internal Medicine, Credit Valley Hospital, Mississauga, Ontario

Kiran Bai

Medicine, Peoples University of Medical and health sciences for women

Deepak Kumar

Internal Medicine, Civil Hospital Sukkur