"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

Margaret Mead
Case report
peer-reviewed

How Resiliency Affects Quality of Life Twenty-two Years Post-cardiac Transplant: a Case Report



Abstract

Heart transplantation has been shown to prolong survival significantly for people who have advanced heart disease. Even with improved prognosis, heart transplant recipients experience a lower overall quality of life compared to their healthy counterparts, which is correlated with high rates of depression and other psychiatric disorders. Our case report examines factors affecting the quality of life over a long period of time in a patient who received a heart transplant 22 years ago. This case is unusual because the patient overcame depression with just a minimal dosage of antidepressants due to her unwavering hope, resilience, and strong social support. This case serves as a reminder to always consider every aspect of a patient’s life, instead of just relying on high dose of medications, in order to improve their emotional and physical states and overall quality of life.



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

Already a member? Login.



Case report
peer-reviewed

How Resiliency Affects Quality of Life Twenty-two Years Post-cardiac Transplant: a Case Report


Author Information

Joslyn Vo

Medicine, Scripps Mercy Hospital


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Share
Case report
peer-reviewed

How Resiliency Affects Quality of Life Twenty-two Years Post-cardiac Transplant: a Case Report

  • Author Information
    Joslyn Vo

    Medicine, Scripps Mercy Hospital

    Davin Agustines Corresponding Author

    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: Consent was obtained by all participants in this study. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: July 14, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1472

    Cite this article as:

    Vo J, Agustines D (July 14, 2017) How Resiliency Affects Quality of Life Twenty-two Years Post-cardiac Transplant: a Case Report. Cureus 9(7): e1472. doi:10.7759/cureus.1472

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: June 15, 2017
    Peer review began: June 23, 2017
    Peer review concluded: July 05, 2017
    Published: July 14, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    Vo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Heart transplantation has been shown to prolong survival significantly for people who have advanced heart disease. Even with improved prognosis, heart transplant recipients experience a lower overall quality of life compared to their healthy counterparts, which is correlated with high rates of depression and other psychiatric disorders. Our case report examines factors affecting the quality of life over a long period of time in a patient who received a heart transplant 22 years ago. This case is unusual because the patient overcame depression with just a minimal dosage of antidepressants due to her unwavering hope, resilience, and strong social support. This case serves as a reminder to always consider every aspect of a patient’s life, instead of just relying on high dose of medications, in order to improve their emotional and physical states and overall quality of life.



Want to read more?

Create a free account to continue reading this article.

Already a member? Login.



Joslyn Vo

Medicine, Scripps Mercy Hospital

Davin Agustines

For correspondence:
dagustines@ucla.edu

Joslyn Vo

Medicine, Scripps Mercy Hospital

Davin Agustines

For correspondence:
dagustines@ucla.edu