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Original article
peer-reviewed

Simulation-based Procedural Skills Maintenance Training for Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Faculty



Abstract

Introduction: Some procedures in neonatal-perinatal medicine are rarely performed in day-to-day clinical practice. Relying on clinical exposure alone to maintain procedural competency in those skills may be inadequate. Simulation-based training provides an option to practice these rarely performed procedures in order to maintain competency. Here, we report the preliminary results of a simulation-based procedural skills maintenance curriculum for neonatal-perinatal medicine faculty.

Methods: Based on a needs assessment survey, we identified several procedures that faculty neonatologists believed would benefit from simulation-based maintenance training. During a two hour simulation session, faculty were divided into small groups and rotated through four separate procedural skills stations: pericardiocentesis, electrocardioversion, defibrillation, and exchange transfusion. Using a collaborative learning model, each group worked as a team to practice the procedural skills. Pre- and post-session surveys were used to evaluate the educational impact of the sessions on both self-perceived knowledge and procedural competency.

Results: Participants reported significant improvements in self-perceived procedural competency in three of the four procedural skills. The majority of participants reported feeling more confident in their ability to perform the procedures after participation in simulation. The overall quality of the event was rated as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ by all participants. All participants ‘agreed’ or ‘strongly agreed’ that they learned something new during the simulation session.

Discussion:  Simulation-based maintenance training for rarely performed procedures in neonatal-perinatal medicine is feasible, and was associated with improvements in self-perceived competency amongst neonatal faculty members. Based on these early results, further investigations are planned.



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Original article
peer-reviewed

Simulation-based Procedural Skills Maintenance Training for Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Faculty


Author Information

Taylor Sawyer Corresponding Author

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington

Thomas Strandjord

Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Original article
peer-reviewed

Simulation-based Procedural Skills Maintenance Training for Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Faculty


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Original article
peer-reviewed

Simulation-based Procedural Skills Maintenance Training for Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Faculty

  • Author Information
    Taylor Sawyer Corresponding Author

    Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington

    Thomas Strandjord

    Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: This study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: This study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: April 23, 2014

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.173

    Cite this article as:

    Sawyer T, Strandjord T (April 23, 2014) Simulation-based Procedural Skills Maintenance Training for Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Faculty. Cureus 6(4): e173. doi:10.7759/cureus.173

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: April 21, 2014
    Peer review began: April 22, 2014
    Peer review concluded: April 23, 2014
    Published: April 23, 2014

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2014
    Sawyer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Introduction: Some procedures in neonatal-perinatal medicine are rarely performed in day-to-day clinical practice. Relying on clinical exposure alone to maintain procedural competency in those skills may be inadequate. Simulation-based training provides an option to practice these rarely performed procedures in order to maintain competency. Here, we report the preliminary results of a simulation-based procedural skills maintenance curriculum for neonatal-perinatal medicine faculty.

Methods: Based on a needs assessment survey, we identified several procedures that faculty neonatologists believed would benefit from simulation-based maintenance training. During a two hour simulation session, faculty were divided into small groups and rotated through four separate procedural skills stations: pericardiocentesis, electrocardioversion, defibrillation, and exchange transfusion. Using a collaborative learning model, each group worked as a team to practice the procedural skills. Pre- and post-session surveys were used to evaluate the educational impact of the sessions on both self-perceived knowledge and procedural competency.

Results: Participants reported significant improvements in self-perceived procedural competency in three of the four procedural skills. The majority of participants reported feeling more confident in their ability to perform the procedures after participation in simulation. The overall quality of the event was rated as ‘good’ or ‘very good’ by all participants. All participants ‘agreed’ or ‘strongly agreed’ that they learned something new during the simulation session.

Discussion:  Simulation-based maintenance training for rarely performed procedures in neonatal-perinatal medicine is feasible, and was associated with improvements in self-perceived competency amongst neonatal faculty members. Based on these early results, further investigations are planned.



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Taylor Sawyer, D.O.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington

For correspondence:
tlsawyer@uw.edu

Thomas Strandjord

Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine

Taylor Sawyer, D.O.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington

For correspondence:
tlsawyer@uw.edu

Thomas Strandjord

Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine