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High-fidelity simulation for paediatric trainees: An assessment of costs and trainee perceptions


Abstract

High-fidelity simulation for paediatric trainees. An assessment of costs and trainee perceptions.

Authors: Dr Nicholas Schindler, Dr Amy Ruffle

Context
High fidelity simulation has been shown to be a valuable learning tool in paediatrics1 along with courses aimed at paediatric trainees moving to level two training which are becoming routine in the United Kingdom2. One of the most commonly cited barriers to simulation is cost3 however there is limited literature about the specific running costs associated with high fidelity simulation4.

Description
We delivered a high-fidelity simulation course for paediatric trainees who were due to progress to level two training. The aim of the course was to prepare them for this transition by simulating common scenarios that they may not have encountered or led in their current roles. The day consisted of six high fidelity clinical simulations and three communication skills scenarios. Formal feedback was collected on the day and again one month after trainees had started in their new posts.

Observation/Evaluation
All paediatric ST3 trainees within the East of England were invited to attend the course, 12 registered and 10 attended on the day.

The cost of the simulation centre was £1,800 including faculty. Course administration was performed by senior paediatric trainees facilitating the day and therefore incurred no additional cost. The overall cost per trainee was £150.

Feedback was received from 8/10 trainees on the day and one month after commencing their registrar posts. Trainees valued scenarios they perceived to be relevant to their everyday practice, targeted their specific stage of training and provided personalised feedback.  

Trainees felt the course improved their confidence in becoming a registrar and this was maintained after starting their new posts. They felt that simulation in groups of more than 2 reduced the value of the feedback they received.

Discussion
High fidelity simulation centres offer a fixed cost per day therefore increasing delegate numbers improves cost-effectiveness. Delegates valued simulation that addressed their specific learning needs and preferred scenarios in pairs because of the more focused exposure and feedback. We hypothesise that high fidelity simulation in pairs therefore provides the most cost-effective outcomes.

References
1 Eppich W, Adler MD, McGaghie WC. Emergency and critical care paediatrics: use of medical simulation for training in acute paediatric emergencies. Curr Opin Paediatr 2006;18:266–71.
2 Moore H, Vrach AA, Lok A, et al. Immersive Paediatric Simulation: Implementation of a Mandatory Regional Paediatric Simulation Course. The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. December 2013; 8(6):471
3 Linda Clerihew, David Rowney, Jean Ker. Simulation in paediatric training. Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed 2016;101:8-14
4 Zendejas B, Wang AT, Brydges R, et al. Cost: the missing outcome in simulation-based medical education research: a systematic review. Surgery 2013;153:160–76

Poster
non-peer-reviewed

High-fidelity simulation for paediatric trainees: An assessment of costs and trainee perceptions


Author Information

Nicholas Schindler Corresponding Author

East of England School of Paediatrics, Health Education England

Amy Ruffle

East of England School of Paediatrics, Heath Education England


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  • Author Information
    Nicholas Schindler Corresponding Author

    East of England School of Paediatrics, Health Education England

    Amy Ruffle

    East of England School of Paediatrics, Heath Education England

    Poster Information
    Meeting

    IPSSW2017 – 9th International Pediatric Simulation Symposia and Workshops June 01, 2017 - June 03, 2017

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: May 15, 2017
    Published: June 01, 2017

    License

    This is an open access poster distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

High-fidelity simulation for paediatric trainees. An assessment of costs and trainee perceptions.

Authors: Dr Nicholas Schindler, Dr Amy Ruffle

Context
High fidelity simulation has been shown to be a valuable learning tool in paediatrics1 along with courses aimed at paediatric trainees moving to level two training which are becoming routine in the United Kingdom2. One of the most commonly cited barriers to simulation is cost3 however there is limited literature about the specific running costs associated with high fidelity simulation4.

Description
We delivered a high-fidelity simulation course for paediatric trainees who were due to progress to level two training. The aim of the course was to prepare them for this transition by simulating common scenarios that they may not have encountered or led in their current roles. The day consisted of six high fidelity clinical simulations and three communication skills scenarios. Formal feedback was collected on the day and again one month after trainees had started in their new posts.

Observation/Evaluation
All paediatric ST3 trainees within the East of England were invited to attend the course, 12 registered and 10 attended on the day.

The cost of the simulation centre was £1,800 including faculty. Course administration was performed by senior paediatric trainees facilitating the day and therefore incurred no additional cost. The overall cost per trainee was £150.

Feedback was received from 8/10 trainees on the day and one month after commencing their registrar posts. Trainees valued scenarios they perceived to be relevant to their everyday practice, targeted their specific stage of training and provided personalised feedback.  

Trainees felt the course improved their confidence in becoming a registrar and this was maintained after starting their new posts. They felt that simulation in groups of more than 2 reduced the value of the feedback they received.

Discussion
High fidelity simulation centres offer a fixed cost per day therefore increasing delegate numbers improves cost-effectiveness. Delegates valued simulation that addressed their specific learning needs and preferred scenarios in pairs because of the more focused exposure and feedback. We hypothesise that high fidelity simulation in pairs therefore provides the most cost-effective outcomes.

References
1 Eppich W, Adler MD, McGaghie WC. Emergency and critical care paediatrics: use of medical simulation for training in acute paediatric emergencies. Curr Opin Paediatr 2006;18:266–71.
2 Moore H, Vrach AA, Lok A, et al. Immersive Paediatric Simulation: Implementation of a Mandatory Regional Paediatric Simulation Course. The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. December 2013; 8(6):471
3 Linda Clerihew, David Rowney, Jean Ker. Simulation in paediatric training. Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed 2016;101:8-14
4 Zendejas B, Wang AT, Brydges R, et al. Cost: the missing outcome in simulation-based medical education research: a systematic review. Surgery 2013;153:160–76

Nicholas Schindler

East of England School of Paediatrics, Health Education England

For correspondence:
nicholas.schindler@doctors.org.uk

Amy Ruffle

East of England School of Paediatrics, Heath Education England

Nicholas Schindler

East of England School of Paediatrics, Health Education England

For correspondence:
nicholas.schindler@doctors.org.uk

Amy Ruffle

East of England School of Paediatrics, Heath Education England

Nicholas Schindler

East of England School of Paediatrics, Health Education England

For correspondence:
nicholas.schindler@doctors.org.uk

Amy Ruffle

East of England School of Paediatrics, Heath Education England

Converted 70096860396e11e7a27ac70f202791cc high fidelity simulation for paediatric trainees. an assessment of costs and trainee perceptions.