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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Using the Association of American Medical Colleges Standardized Video Interview in a Holistic Residency Application Review



Abstract

Each year, residency programs work diligently to identify the best applicants for their respective programs, given the increasing volume of applications. Interview offers are often based on a mix of subjective and objective measures, with different programs relying more or less on each. A holistic application review involves a flexible and individualized way of assessing an applicant’s capabilities through a balanced consideration of experiences, attributes, and academic metrics. When considered collectively, these attributes may define how an individual may perform as a physician. One particular tool developed by the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Standardized Video Interview (SVI), provides an objective measure of an applicant's professional behavior and interpersonal communication skills. The SVI may provide applicants with a chance to showcase the intangibles about themselves that are neither entered on their application nor reflected by their standardized examination scores.



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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Using the Association of American Medical Colleges Standardized Video Interview in a Holistic Residency Application Review


Author Information

Andrew King Corresponding Author

Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Chad Mayer

Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Andrew Starnes

Emergency Medicine, The University of Oklahoma - Tulsa

Kelly Barringer

Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital

Lancelot Beier

Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University

Harsh Sule

Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.


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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Using the Association of American Medical Colleges Standardized Video Interview in a Holistic Residency Application Review

Andrew King">Andrew King , Chad Mayer">Chad Mayer, Andrew Starnes">Andrew Starnes, Kelly Barringer">Kelly Barringer, Lancelot Beier">Lancelot Beier, Harsh Sule">Harsh Sule

  • Author Information
    Andrew King Corresponding Author

    Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

    Chad Mayer

    Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

    Andrew Starnes

    Emergency Medicine, The University of Oklahoma - Tulsa

    Kelly Barringer

    Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital

    Lancelot Beier

    Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University

    Harsh Sule

    Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Human subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve human participants or tissue. Animal subjects: All authors have confirmed that this study did not involve animal subjects or tissue. Conflicts of interest: In compliance with the ICMJE uniform disclosure form, all authors declare the following: Payment/services info: All authors have declared that no financial support was received from any organization for the submitted work. Financial relationships: All authors have declared that they have no financial relationships at present or within the previous three years with any organizations that might have an interest in the submitted work. Other relationships: All authors have declared that there are no other relationships or activities that could appear to have influenced the submitted work.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: December 06, 2017

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.1913

    Cite this article as:

    King A, Mayer C, Starnes A, et al. (December 06, 2017) Using the Association of American Medical Colleges Standardized Video Interview in a Holistic Residency Application Review. Cureus 9(12): e1913. doi:10.7759/cureus.1913

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: November 27, 2017
    Peer review began: November 28, 2017
    Peer review concluded: December 04, 2017
    Published: December 06, 2017

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2017
    King et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Each year, residency programs work diligently to identify the best applicants for their respective programs, given the increasing volume of applications. Interview offers are often based on a mix of subjective and objective measures, with different programs relying more or less on each. A holistic application review involves a flexible and individualized way of assessing an applicant’s capabilities through a balanced consideration of experiences, attributes, and academic metrics. When considered collectively, these attributes may define how an individual may perform as a physician. One particular tool developed by the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC), the Standardized Video Interview (SVI), provides an objective measure of an applicant's professional behavior and interpersonal communication skills. The SVI may provide applicants with a chance to showcase the intangibles about themselves that are neither entered on their application nor reflected by their standardized examination scores.



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Create a free account to continue reading this article.

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Andrew King

Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

For correspondence:
andrew.king3@osumc.edu

Chad Mayer

Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Andrew Starnes, Medical Student

Emergency Medicine, The University of Oklahoma - Tulsa

Kelly Barringer

Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital

Lancelot Beier

Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University

Harsh Sule

Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School

Andrew King

Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

For correspondence:
andrew.king3@osumc.edu

Chad Mayer

Emergency Medicine, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Andrew Starnes, Medical Student

Emergency Medicine, The University of Oklahoma - Tulsa

Kelly Barringer

Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital

Lancelot Beier

Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University

Harsh Sule

Emergency Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School