"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

Margaret Mead

Reciprocal Inuit-Graduate Student Research Training in the Canadian Arctic



Abstract

Social, cultural, and linguistic distance between a community and researchers pose challenges to establishing a shared framework for research ethics. Cross-cultural research ethics training can encourage dialogue, advance ethical practice, and foster collaboration. The University of Alberta, in collaboration with the Aqqiumavvik Society, launched a research training workshop series in Nunavut. The aims were to enhance understanding of Indigenous and Western ethical frameworks and research methods, and to encourage reciprocal, cross-cultural research awareness and engagement. The training was in the context of a health and law research project. The workshop model provides a way of engaging with communities and Inuit researchers so that Inuit ethical perspectives are honoured through research methodologies. Feedback from participants provided preliminary evidence that this approach was supported. The research training workshops were intended to address calls to action by the 2015 Truth and Reconciliation Commission that encourage collaborative change involving Indigenous communities and peoples.

Related content

abstract
non-peer-reviewed

Reciprocal Inuit-Graduate Student Research Training in the Canadian Arctic


Author Information

Priscilla Ferrazzi Corresponding Author

Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta

Djenana Jalovcic

Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

Shirley Tagalik

Aqqiumavvik Society, Arviat, Nunavut


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