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Michael W. McDermott
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Michael W. McDermott

M.D. | Neurological Surgery

Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California, San Francisco
San Francisco, CA, United States
Biography

Dr. Michael W. McDermott is Professor in Residence, Vice-Chairman and Residency Program Director in the Department of Neurosurgery, UCSF. He is the Robert and Ruth Halperin Chair in Meningioma Research and the Co-Director of the Skull Base Surgery and Gamma Knife Radiosurgery Programs. Dr. McDermott completed medical school at the University of Toronto and Neurosurgical Residency at the University of British Columbia. He was awarded a research fellowship in the Neuro-Oncology Program of the Brain Tumor Research Center at UCSF Medical Center. Thereafter, he joined UCSF for two years as a Neuro-Oncology fellow at the Brain Tumor Research Center (BTRC) and then returned to the University of British Columbia for two years. Since 1992, he has been on the faculty at UCSF and has a clinical interest in skull base and meningioma surgery as well as radiosurgery. Dr. McDermott cares for patients with a wide range of conditions, including brain tumors, neurological cancers, central nervous system infections, and hydrocephalus. He is published in over 200 articles in the peer-reviewed literature. Currently, his research interests are meningioma cell lines and animal models in the BTRC at UCSF.

Stability of Programmable Shunt Valve Settings with Simultaneous U ...
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A Superior Cerebellar Convexity Two-Part Craniotomy to Access the ...
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Surgical Cavity Constriction and Local Progression Between Resecti ...
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Techniques for the Application of Stereotactic Head Frames Based o ...
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8.0
Resident-led Implementation of a Standardized Handoff System to Fa ...
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Meningiomas of the Anterior Clinoid Process: Is It Wise to Drill O ...
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Intraoperative Conversion from Endoscopic to Open Transcortical-Tr ...
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Vertebral Artery Fenestration
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Temporalis Muscle Suspension on Synthetic Cranioplasty: Technical Note
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Resection of Bilateral C1 Neurofibromas Using a Unilateral Modifie ...
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Two-Part Parasagittal Craniotomy: Technical Note
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Securing Cranial Horizontal-Vertical Valve in Proper Orientation ...
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Rotational Pericranial Flap for Repair of Refractory Posterior Fos ...
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Keyhole Revision after Failed Subdural Craniostomy for Chronic Sub ...
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Two-Part Pterional Craniotomy
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Recession of Ommaya Reservoir Improves Cosmesis in Patients Underg ...
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The Watering Can Technique for Prevention of Postoperative Epidura ...
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Meningiomas of the Anterior Clinoid Process: Is It Wise to Drill Out the Optic Canal?

Original Article
Commented on: September 10, 2015

A special thanks to our department artist Ken Probst for his outstanding art work. We hope this step by step presentation of the surgical technique with combined intra-operative images and line drawings will help other surgeons and their patients realize improved surgical outcomes.


Management of Intracranial Meningiomas Using Keyhole Techniques

Original Article
Commented on: April 27, 2016

Very nice presentation. I like the diagrams. Was looking for mean/median tumor dimensions, mean/median tumor volumes to get a handle on tumor size for these approaches. Openings seem standard for supra orbital mini-pterional and mini-retrosigmoid so the concept would be nicely fleshed out by comparison of tumor and opening dimensions. This could be done with same patient group and data as follow up for interested surgeons."Comparisons of craniotomy size to tumor dimensions using the key-hole methods: a mathematic approach to surgical aspect ratio". Something like that. Bring it Dr. Sughrue!😉


Two-Part Pterional Craniotomy

Technical Report
Commented on: December 01, 2012

Agree but hard to get cuts done for part one and not take down temporalis anteriorly which is part of why patients get atrophy I think. Thanks John.


Two-Part Pterional Craniotomy

Technical Report
Commented on: December 01, 2012

Thanks Jim. It only took me about 15 years to realize there might be an alternative to standard approach. I agree with others that part of the cosmetic result is related to degree of temporalis atrophy. John may be right about leaving muscle but you would still have to dis-insert the muscle off the superior temporal line to some degree up front to get cuts done.


Two-Part Pterional Craniotomy

Technical Report
Commented on: December 01, 2012

I think pictures done by our artist in step by step approach help with understanding the steps. I also posted a video on YouTube so check out the link in methods section or just search two part pterional. This was a cadaver study done with skull base group at training session in Tawain.