"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

Margaret Mead

Innovative Interprofessional End of Life Education for Transplant Clinicians


Abstract

Overcoming communication barriers with patients and families facing end of life improves the end of life experience (Beckstrand, Rawle, Callister, & Mandleco, 2010). A needs assessment demonstrated that inpatient pediatric surgical nurses felt uncomfortable communicating with patients and families around end of life topics. Based on the feedback in the needs assessment, the nursing professional development specialists, with the help of a graduate student, developed a four hour interprofessional education program that included role playing opportunities, practice with open ended questions and a Zone 3 Simulation and debriefing (SIMPeds, 2016).

The interprofessional group included a rabbi, Imam, social worker, child life specialist, nurses, and clinical assistants. During the simulation experiences the attendees participated in a time lapse scenario that utilized actors to bring realism to the scenario and provided the learners with the opportunity to practice the communication strategies reviewed in the didactic portion of the course. The simulation experienced engaged all participants and encouraged them to demonstrate the communication strategies based on their individual areas of expertise. At the completion of the simulation experience, the learners are provided with an opportunity to practice post-mortem care and are invited to tour the morgue. Nurses were given a pre and post knowledge check, to measure impact of education.

Related content

Poster
non-peer-reviewed

Innovative Interprofessional End of Life Education for Transplant Clinicians


Author Information

Shelly Pignataro Corresponding Author

Surgical Programs, Boston Children's Hospital


PDF Print Share

Abstract

Overcoming communication barriers with patients and families facing end of life improves the end of life experience (Beckstrand, Rawle, Callister, & Mandleco, 2010). A needs assessment demonstrated that inpatient pediatric surgical nurses felt uncomfortable communicating with patients and families around end of life topics. Based on the feedback in the needs assessment, the nursing professional development specialists, with the help of a graduate student, developed a four hour interprofessional education program that included role playing opportunities, practice with open ended questions and a Zone 3 Simulation and debriefing (SIMPeds, 2016).

The interprofessional group included a rabbi, Imam, social worker, child life specialist, nurses, and clinical assistants. During the simulation experiences the attendees participated in a time lapse scenario that utilized actors to bring realism to the scenario and provided the learners with the opportunity to practice the communication strategies reviewed in the didactic portion of the course. The simulation experienced engaged all participants and encouraged them to demonstrate the communication strategies based on their individual areas of expertise. At the completion of the simulation experience, the learners are provided with an opportunity to practice post-mortem care and are invited to tour the morgue. Nurses were given a pre and post knowledge check, to measure impact of education.

Shelly Pignataro

Surgical Programs, Boston Children's Hospital

For correspondence:
shelly.pignataro@childrens.harvard.edu

Shelly Pignataro

Surgical Programs, Boston Children's Hospital

For correspondence:
shelly.pignataro@childrens.harvard.edu

Shelly Pignataro

Surgical Programs, Boston Children's Hospital

For correspondence:
shelly.pignataro@childrens.harvard.edu

Converted_6478e4d0364411e7be940f308ecd6af7-innovative_interprofessional_end_of_life_education2