"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."

Margaret Mead

Long live gamification: Quantitative analysis of a gamified undergraduate course.


Abstract

Gamification is the utilization of game concepts such as quests, leaderboards, and die rolling into educational material and classes (Deterding et al, 2011). Gamification has been used in a healthcare to increase engagement amongst employees (Nevin et al. 2014; Huang, 2013; Singh, 2012;). Taking that notion to education gamification can be used to increase engagement amongst students not only increasing retention but also communication between student and teachers (Hanus, & Fox, 2015; Muntean, 2011). This poster presents on a recent gaimification study on how gamification can increase engagement with teachers and students, and the challenges associated with implementing gamification into a course. The two main research questions from the study are 1) What is the perceived impact on course engagement and performance? And 2) what are the challenges in delivering a gamified course? Data was collected through two student questionnaires, one half way through the course (about week 7) and one at the end of the course (week 12).

The three main questions to be presented are 1) did the students enjoy the course overall?, 2) would students want to take more gamified courses? and 3) did the course hold my attention?. Results from the posed questions indicate that over 80% of students found the course enjoyable or very enjoyable, and that over 75% of students said they agreed or strongly agreed that they wanted to take more gamified courses. With regards to the challenges of gamification, over 75% of students disagreed or strongly disagreed that the course did not hold their attention saying that the majority of students were engaged in the course and content. Although gamifying education seems to be a new field, it is shown in our results that it can have a positive outcome. Gamification can be used to increase enjoyment among the students thus increased engagement between students and teachers.
 

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Poster
non-peer-reviewed

Long live gamification: Quantitative analysis of a gamified undergraduate course.


Author Information

Pamela Livingstone Corresponding Author

N/A, Ryerson University

Robert Bajko

N/A, Mount Saint Vincent University

Jaigris Hodson

N/A, Royal Roads University


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  • Author Information
    Pamela Livingstone

    N/A, Ryerson University

    Robert Bajko

    N/A, Mount Saint Vincent University

    Jaigris Hodson

    N/A, Royal Roads University

    Poster Information
    Meeting

    Sim Expo October 06, 2016 - October 07, 2016

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: October 03, 2016
    Published: October 06, 2016

    License

    This is an open access poster distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Gamification is the utilization of game concepts such as quests, leaderboards, and die rolling into educational material and classes (Deterding et al, 2011). Gamification has been used in a healthcare to increase engagement amongst employees (Nevin et al. 2014; Huang, 2013; Singh, 2012;). Taking that notion to education gamification can be used to increase engagement amongst students not only increasing retention but also communication between student and teachers (Hanus, & Fox, 2015; Muntean, 2011). This poster presents on a recent gaimification study on how gamification can increase engagement with teachers and students, and the challenges associated with implementing gamification into a course. The two main research questions from the study are 1) What is the perceived impact on course engagement and performance? And 2) what are the challenges in delivering a gamified course? Data was collected through two student questionnaires, one half way through the course (about week 7) and one at the end of the course (week 12).

The three main questions to be presented are 1) did the students enjoy the course overall?, 2) would students want to take more gamified courses? and 3) did the course hold my attention?. Results from the posed questions indicate that over 80% of students found the course enjoyable or very enjoyable, and that over 75% of students said they agreed or strongly agreed that they wanted to take more gamified courses. With regards to the challenges of gamification, over 75% of students disagreed or strongly disagreed that the course did not hold their attention saying that the majority of students were engaged in the course and content. Although gamifying education seems to be a new field, it is shown in our results that it can have a positive outcome. Gamification can be used to increase enjoyment among the students thus increased engagement between students and teachers.
 

Pamela Livingstone

N/A, Ryerson University

For correspondence:
pamela.livingstone@ryerson.ca

Robert Bajko

N/A, Mount Saint Vincent University

Jaigris Hodson

N/A, Royal Roads University

Pamela Livingstone

N/A, Ryerson University

For correspondence:
pamela.livingstone@ryerson.ca

Robert Bajko

N/A, Mount Saint Vincent University

Jaigris Hodson

N/A, Royal Roads University

Pamela Livingstone

N/A, Ryerson University

For correspondence:
pamela.livingstone@ryerson.ca

Robert Bajko

N/A, Mount Saint Vincent University

Jaigris Hodson

N/A, Royal Roads University

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