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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Vaginal Examination Simulation Using Citrus Fruit to Simulate Cervical Dilation and Effacement



Abstract

This technical report describes the creation and use of a cervical dilation and effacement model in a pre-licensure nursing course in reproductive health. Vaginal examination is typically taught in reproductive health courses; however, nursing students do not always have sufficient opportunity to practice on actual patients. This low-cost task-training model provides undergraduate nursing students the opportunity to experience performing a vaginal examination to assess for cervical dilation and effacement during the labor process.



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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Vaginal Examination Simulation Using Citrus Fruit to Simulate Cervical Dilation and Effacement


Author Information

Kathleen L. Shea

School of Nursing, San Francisco State University

Edward J. Rovera Corresponding Author

School of Nursing, San Francisco State University


Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.


Technical report
peer-reviewed

Vaginal Examination Simulation Using Citrus Fruit to Simulate Cervical Dilation and Effacement


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Technical report
peer-reviewed

Vaginal Examination Simulation Using Citrus Fruit to Simulate Cervical Dilation and Effacement

  • Author Information
    Kathleen L. Shea

    School of Nursing, San Francisco State University

    Edward J. Rovera Corresponding Author

    School of Nursing, San Francisco State University


    Ethics Statement and Conflict of Interest Disclosures

    Conflicts of interest: The authors have declared that no conflicts of interest exist.

    Acknowledgements


    Article Information

    Published: September 01, 2015

    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.314

    Cite this article as:

    Shea K L, Rovera E J. (September 01, 2015) Vaginal Examination Simulation Using Citrus Fruit to Simulate Cervical Dilation and Effacement . Cureus 7(9): e314. doi:10.7759/cureus.314

    Publication history

    Received by Cureus: July 29, 2015
    Peer review began: July 30, 2015
    Peer review concluded: August 10, 2015
    Published: September 01, 2015

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2015
    Shea et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

This technical report describes the creation and use of a cervical dilation and effacement model in a pre-licensure nursing course in reproductive health. Vaginal examination is typically taught in reproductive health courses; however, nursing students do not always have sufficient opportunity to practice on actual patients. This low-cost task-training model provides undergraduate nursing students the opportunity to experience performing a vaginal examination to assess for cervical dilation and effacement during the labor process.



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Kathleen L. Shea, None

School of Nursing, San Francisco State University

Edward J. Rovera, M.Sc.

School of Nursing, San Francisco State University

For correspondence:
edrovera@sfsu.edu

Kathleen L. Shea, None

School of Nursing, San Francisco State University

Edward J. Rovera, M.Sc.

School of Nursing, San Francisco State University

For correspondence:
edrovera@sfsu.edu