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Review article
peer-reviewed

Correction: Hypersexuality Addiction and Withdrawal: Phenomenology, Neurogenetics and Epigenetics



Correction

This article erroneously claims that hypersexuality has been included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). The original, erroneous instances are detailed below, along with the corresponding corrected versions.

The opening sentence of the abstract states, “Hypersexuality is now part of the DSM-V [...].” The corrected sentence reads: “Hypersexuality has been defined as abnormally increased sexual activity.”

The final two sentences of the Introduction & Background section state, “Hypersexuality can now be found in the DSM-V. This major accomplishment required intensive work by Kafka, Reid and associates, Bancroft, and even the World Health Organization, among others [8-11].” The corrected sentences read: “Hypersexuality is not found in the DSM-5. This inclusion, which would be a major accomplishment, continues to require intensive work by Kafka, Reid and associates, Bancroft, and even the World Health Organization, among others [8-11].”

The opening sentence of the Conclusions section states, “While it is important that hypersexuality disorder is now included in the DSM-V [...].” The corrected sentence reads: “While we firmly believe that it is important that hypersexuality disorder is included in the DSM-5 [...].”

Review article
peer-reviewed

Correction: Hypersexuality Addiction and Withdrawal: Phenomenology, Neurogenetics and Epigenetics


Author Information

Kenneth Blum Corresponding Author

Department of Psychiatry, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida

Rajendra D. Badgaiyan

Department of Psychiatry, and Laboratory of Advanced Radiochemistry, University of Minnesota School of Medicine

Mark S. Gold

Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA, USA


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Review article
peer-reviewed

Correction: Hypersexuality Addiction and Withdrawal: Phenomenology, Neurogenetics and Epigenetics

  • Author Information
    Kenneth Blum Corresponding Author

    Department of Psychiatry, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida

    Rajendra D. Badgaiyan

    Department of Psychiatry, and Laboratory of Advanced Radiochemistry, University of Minnesota School of Medicine

    Mark S. Gold

    Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA, USA


    Correction Information
    DOI

    10.7759/cureus.c1

    Cite this erratum as:

    Blum K, Badgaiyan R D, Gold M S (September 11, 2015) Correction: Hypersexuality Addiction and Withdrawal: Phenomenology, Neurogenetics and Epigenetics. Cureus 7(9): c1. doi:10.7759/cureus.c1

    Publication history

    Article received by Cureus: July 23, 2015
    Article peer review began: July 24, 2015
    Article peer review concluded: July 27, 2015
    Article published: July 27, 2015
    Article corrected: September 11, 2015

    Copyright

    © Copyright 2015
    Blum et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

    License

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Correction

This article erroneously claims that hypersexuality has been included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). The original, erroneous instances are detailed below, along with the corresponding corrected versions.

The opening sentence of the abstract states, “Hypersexuality is now part of the DSM-V [...].” The corrected sentence reads: “Hypersexuality has been defined as abnormally increased sexual activity.”

The final two sentences of the Introduction & Background section state, “Hypersexuality can now be found in the DSM-V. This major accomplishment required intensive work by Kafka, Reid and associates, Bancroft, and even the World Health Organization, among others [8-11].” The corrected sentences read: “Hypersexuality is not found in the DSM-5. This inclusion, which would be a major accomplishment, continues to require intensive work by Kafka, Reid and associates, Bancroft, and even the World Health Organization, among others [8-11].”

The opening sentence of the Conclusions section states, “While it is important that hypersexuality disorder is now included in the DSM-V [...].” The corrected sentence reads: “While we firmly believe that it is important that hypersexuality disorder is included in the DSM-5 [...].”

Kenneth Blum

Department of Psychiatry, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida

For correspondence:
drd2gene@gmail.com

Rajendra D. Badgaiyan, M.D., Professor

Department of Psychiatry, and Laboratory of Advanced Radiochemistry, University of Minnesota School of Medicine

Mark S. Gold

Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA, USA

Kenneth Blum

Department of Psychiatry, McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida

For correspondence:
drd2gene@gmail.com

Rajendra D. Badgaiyan, M.D., Professor

Department of Psychiatry, and Laboratory of Advanced Radiochemistry, University of Minnesota School of Medicine

Mark S. Gold

Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, CA, USA